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Success! Naw Ywa from Thailand raised $1,500 to fund gynecological surgery to alleviate her pain and discomfort.

Naw Ywa
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Naw Ywa's treatment was fully funded on October 5, 2022.
August 16, 2022

Naw Ywa is a 29-year-old woman who lives with her husband, sister-in-law, and three nieces in a refugee camp in Thailand. Naw Ywa is a homemaker, and she weaves and sells traditional Karen clothing in her spare time. Her husband also works as a homemaker and cares for his sister, who has a mobility impairment. Naw Ywa’s three nieces all currently attend school in the refugee camp.

This past March, Naw Ywa began to experience severe pain in her left pelvic area. This pain was accompanied by fatigue, dizziness, and trouble breathing. Although she did seek medical attention at the hospital in the refugee camp, she was only given painkillers, which temporarily alleviated her symptoms. After a few months of repeatedly being readmitted to the hospital without fully treating her condition, a doctor referred Naw Ywa to our medical partner’s care center, Mae Sariang Hospital (MSH).

On July 6th, she was brought to MSH and received an ultrasound. Her doctor diagnosed her with adenomyosis, a condition that occurs when the tissue that typically lines the uterus grows into the muscular wall of the uterus. She was also diagnosed with a five cm large myoma, which is a tumor that develops in or around the uterus. Her doctor has advised that she undergo a hysterectomy to remove her uterus and alleviate her symptoms.

Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund Naw Ywa’s total abdominal hysterectomy. The procedure is scheduled to take place on August 17th. Once completed, she will hopefully be able to live more comfortably and confidently.

Naw Ywa shares, “Me and my husband want to have children, but we agreed with the doctor’s plan. I do not want to experience this pain anymore, and my husband also does not want to see me in pain.”

Naw Ywa is a 29-year-old woman who lives with her husband, sister-in-law, and three nieces in a refugee camp in Thailand. Naw Ywa is a homem...

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Naw Ywa's Timeline

  • August 16, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Naw Ywa was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • August 17, 2022
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Naw Ywa was scheduled to receive treatment at Mae Sariang Hospital in Thailand. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • August 17, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Naw Ywa's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • October 5, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Naw Ywa's treatment was fully funded.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Naw Ywa's treatment update from Burma Children Medical Fund.

Treatment
Total abdominal hysterectomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $1,665 for Naw Ywa's treatment
Subsidies fund $165 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$682
Medical Staff
$561
Medication
$0
Supplies
$228
Labs
$154
Other
$40
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients may experience a feeling of heaviness in the pelvis, tissue protrusion from a sensitive area, urinary and bowel dysfunction, and lower back pain. More symptoms include lower abdominal pain, pelvic pain, quickly feeling full when eating, weight loss, discomfort in the pelvis area, changes in bowel habits, such as constipation, a frequent need to urinate, abdominal, pelvic, or lower back pain that can be severe, episodic, or constant, abdominal pressure, abdominal swelling, distension or bloating, heavy bleeding during menstrual period (menorrhagia).

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients may experience intermittent pain in the abdomen and spotting. If the pain becomes debilitating and chronic, patients may be unable to participate in daily life. It may be difficult for women to care for their families, complete day-to-day tasks, and work.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Because of the sensitive nature of gynecological conditions, patients may delay seeking care. Many patients do not have the means to travel or pay for surgery or are not able to take time away from their family and work to seek treatment.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient undergoes blood testing and an ultrasound scan to confirm the diagnosis. If the patient does not have any other medical conditions, surgery can be performed quickly. If the patient has another health condition, such as high blood pressure or diabetes, its symptoms must be managed before surgery. A patient usually spends about 4-5 days in the hospital.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This treatment can completely change a patient’s life. After the surgery, the patient will see her condition and symptoms improve. Pain, fatigue, menstruation abnormalities, and urinary dysfunction will be alleviated.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Side effects can include fever, infection, heavy bleeding during or after surgery, injury to the urinary tract or nearby organs, blood clots, problems related to anesthesia, and death.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Although this type of treatment is available in most of district hospital in Thailand, patients cannot access care because of the high cost of surgery.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are not many alternatives, especially for women who are older. Doctors will suggest this treatment to reduce the chance of recurrence of masses/cysts/myoma. Some women opt to treat the symptoms with pain medicine or traditional medicine. Ultimately, however, mass removal or a hysterectomy are the only options to resolve the condition and improve the symptoms.

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Laurencia

Laurencia is a 9-year-old girl and the seventh born in a family of nine siblings. She is a student at the nearby primary school. Her parents are small-scale farmers who plant vegetables for sale and for the family's needs. Some of her siblings are in high school, so her father uses his small income to pay for their school fees and to provide for other family needs. They are from a semi-arid area which faces drought and most of their crops are sorghum and millet. There is a food and water shortage in the area, and they shared that bandits often attack them. Life has been quite challenging, but they have persevered. Laurencia came to AIC Kapsowar Hospital with a bandaged right arm. She had an x-ray from another facility, which showed that she had broken both the ulna and the radius after falling from a mango tree while harvesting mangoes. She is in pain and unable to use her hand. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On November 1st, Laurencia will undergo an open reduction and internal fixation surgical procedure to put the broken bones back in place. Her hand will be able to heal well and she will be able to use it again. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $941 to fund this procedure. Laurencias’ father says, “This incident happened just when I was paying my other children's school fees. I am worried now that I cannot help my daughter when she is in need. Please help her so that she can be able to grow in a normal way.”

44% funded

44%funded
$419raised
$522to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.