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Janet is a hardworking and strong mother from the Philippines who needs $983 to fund life-saving surgery to help fight her breast cancer.

Janet
44%
  • $437 raised, $546 to go
$437
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$546
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August 11, 2022

Janet is a hardworking mother of two from the Philippines. To support their family, she works as a merchandiser, and her partner works as an on-call construction worker.

Janet has been diagnosed with breast cancer. In 2013, she discovered a mass on her right breast and underwent surgery to remove it, but the mass unfortunately reoccurred in 2015. However, this time there was a mass on each of her breasts. When she was finally able to seek medical care, an ultrasound showed that the masses have grown in size and need to be surgically removed. Without treatment, the cancer may spread to other organs. A mastectomy, a surgery to remove breast tissue, has been suggested to rid her body of breast cancer and to prevent the cancer from metastasizing.

Fortunately, our medical partner, World Surgical Foundation Philippines (WSFP), is helping Janet receive treatment. She is scheduled to undergo a mastectomy on August 13th at Our Lady of Peace Hospital. A portion of the cost of her treatment is being supported by the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation, and WSFP is raising $983 to cover the remaining amount. After treatment, Janet will hopefully return to a cancer-free life.

Janet shared, “This free surgery is a big help for me. We don’t have to worry about my medical expenses anymore. Thank you so much Watsi and World Surgical Foundation Philippines for your help!”

Janet is a hardworking mother of two from the Philippines. To support their family, she works as a merchandiser, and her partner works as an...

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Janet's Timeline

  • August 11, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Janet was submitted by Abegail Joy Cervania, Marketing and Communications Officer at World Surgical Foundation Philippines.

  • August 12, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Janet's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • August 13, 2022
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Janet was scheduled to receive treatment at Our Lady of Peace Hospital in Philippines. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    Janet is currently raising funds for her treatment.

  • TBD
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Janet's treatment update from World Surgical Foundation Philippines.

Funded by 19 donors

Funded by 19 donors

Treatment
Breast Mastectomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $983 for Janet's treatment
Hospital Fees
$91
Medical Staff
$268
Medication
$46
Supplies
$448
Labs
$66
Radiology
$11
Other
$53
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Breast cysts may be found in one or both breasts. Signs and symptoms of a cyst include a smooth, easily movable round or oval lump, discharge, breast pain or tenderness in the area of the lump, or a change in lump size and tenderness.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Having breast cysts doesn't always increase the patient's risk of breast cancer. But having cysts may make it harder to find new breast lumps or other changes that might need evaluation by the doctor.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

In the Philippines, breast cancer is the leading cancer in women. The Department of Health and the Philippine Cancer Society Inc. population-based cancer registries reported an age-standardized incidence rate of 55.1 per 100,000, the highest recorded incidence rate in any Asian population. Along with the high incidence is a high mortality rate.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

A mastectomy is the removal of the whole breast. There are five different types of mastectomy: "simple" or "total" mastectomy, modified radical mastectomy, radical mastectomy, partial mastectomy, and subcutaneous mastectomy.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

After the mastectomy, the treatment may prevent breast cancer from recurring. It will significantly improve the patient's life by avoiding the diagnosis of breast cancer, cancer that can spread, and the pain due to the breast mass.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

As with any surgical procedure, a mastectomy can cause a number of complications. Risks of this procedure include pain or tenderness, bleeding, swelling, redness and warmth at the incision site, suggestive of infection, limited arm movement, numbness, seroma, or fluid buildup beneath the wound site, hematoma, or blood buildup in the wound, and scar tissue.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

The care facility is equipped and accessible to handle this procedure for patients from across the Capital region and those who travel from other parts of the country.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

For patients in whom the size of the primary tumor relative to the size of the breast makes breast-conserving surgery an inappropriate choice, an alternative to mastectomy is preoperative chemotherapy.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Saw Wah

Saw Wah is a 14-year-old grade six student from Burma. Saw Wah lives with his parents and five younger brothers in a village in Hpapun Township in Karen State where there is a lot of unrest currently. Saw Wah's father works as a day labourer when there is no work on the farm. Saw Wah's youngest brother is too young to enroll in school while his four other brothers stopped going to school this last year. Saw Wah shared, “They do not want to attend school because fighting happens very often in this area. We have to run and hide in the jungle where we study and they do not like to study in the jungle.” Saw Wah’s family also raises chickens and two goats for their own consumption. They also often go fishing and forage for vegetables in the jungle. Even though his family does not have a regular income, they can gather enough food. Saw Wah's family receives free basic healthcare at a free clinic near their village. Around 2018 or 2019, Saw Wah developed a runny nose with yellowish nasal discharge. At first, he thought that this was normal, and it would go away on its own. Towards the end of April 2022, Saw Wah nose became blocked, and he could no longer breath through his nose. He finally told his parents about his symptoms and his father took him to the free clinic at Ei Tu Hta Internally Displaced Camp. At the clinic, the medic checked Saw Wah's nostrils and told them that there is mass blocking the nasal passage in both of his nostrils. The medic also recommended Saw Wah go to a larger hospital for further investigation. At this time, Saw Wah has to breathe through his mouth which causes him discomfort. He has lost his sense of taste and smell, and has a hard time sleeping. Due to these symptoms, Saw Wah has had to stop his studies while he receives treatment. Saw Wah worries that it will take a while, and he will not be able to study this year. Fortunately, Saw Wah sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF). Now he is scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery on September 6th. BCMF is fundraising $1,500 to cover the cost of Saw Wah's procedure and care. Saw Wah shared, "I am excited to receive surgery and I hope that I will be able to breath through my nose after surgery."

78% funded

78%funded
$1,173raised
$327to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.