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Queen is a sweet 4-month-old from Tanzania who needs $935 to fund clubfoot repair surgery.

Queen
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  • $786 raised, $149 to go
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$149
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November 17, 2022

Queen is an adorable 4-month-old baby from Tanzania. Her mother is a sole proprietor who has recently started a new small business, while her father works as a security guard. Queen has an older sibling. While their current income is limited, her mother is confident that her new business provide for their family’s basic needs.

Queen has clubfoot of both feet. Clubfoot is a condition in which the foot is twisted out of shape, which causes difficulty walking and even wearing shoes. Queen’s parents took her to a nearby hospital, but they lacked the needed specialized medical staff. Concerned about waiting a long time for a consultation, Queen’s father visited another hospital but experienced the same issue. Queen’s father then visited the hospital of our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), where the doctors were able to diagnose the condition and recommended surgery.

On November 18th, Queen will undergo clubfoot repair surgery that will allow her to learn to stand and walk as she grows. AMH is requesting $935 to fund this procedure.

Queen’s father shared: “We have been traveling far and wide in pursuit of a cure for our daughter. We’re determined to see her feet get back to normal. We appeal for your financial support to help our daughter receive treatment.”

Queen is an adorable 4-month-old baby from Tanzania. Her mother is a sole proprietor who has recently started a new small business, while he...

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Queen's Timeline

  • November 17, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Queen was submitted by SAFE Program Admin, SAFE Program Admin at African Mission Healthcare.

  • November 18, 2022
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Queen was scheduled to receive treatment at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre (ALMC) in Tanzania. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • November 18, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Queen's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    Queen is currently raising funds for her treatment.

  • TBD
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Queen's treatment update from African Mission Healthcare.

Funded by 12 donors

Funded by 12 donors

Treatment
Clubfoot
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $935 for Queen's treatment
Hospital Fees
$693
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$8
Supplies
$175
Labs
$14
Other
$45
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The foot is turned inward, often severely, at the ankle, and the arch of the foot is very high. Patients experience discomfort, and the affected leg may be shorter and smaller than the other.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

These children have a difficult time walking and running. Years of trying to walk on a clubfoot will cause wounds and other skeletal problems, such as arthritis. Patients will have difficulty fitting in shoes and participating in normal play, school, and daily activities. Many Africans make their livings through manual labor, which can be difficult with an untreated clubfoot.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Incidence is 1/1,000 live births, or about 1,600 cases in Tanzania annually. This is roughly similar to rates in Western countries, though many cases may be missed. There is no known reason for its occurrence in this region.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Patients will undergo a series of small operations, casting, and manipulations during their course of treatment. Patients will stay in the Plaster House, a rehabilitation center for children in Tanzania, for as long as their recovery takes.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The bones and joint will become aligned, and long-term disability will be prevented.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Clubfoot is very treatable. The surgery is minor and not risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Care is not easily accessible. Most patients live in remote, rural areas and are identified through mobile outreach. The pediatric surgical program at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre was started to meet the large burden of pediatric disability in the region.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If not treated, the condition will persist and will result in disability.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

William

William is a small-scale farmer from Kenya. He is a married man with twelve children. Some of his oldest children are married while others are still in school. William and his family live in a semi-permanent house. He has been a long-term potato farmer who has been growing them mainly for sale. His family has worked on their farm and it has contributed a lot to their income. Through the limited income William makes, he has been able to provide for his children's basic needs. William has medical insurance that he has been using throughout all his visits for inpatient and outpatient services for his medical procedures. In May 2019, when William was walking along the road, he was hit by a motorbike and he fell down, thus injuring his lower limb. Immediately, he was taken to a facility where he was admitted and surgery was done.  All was well up to last year when he started feeling unwell and decided to visit our partner's hospital. He presented with a lot of pain, he had a wound that was discharging pus, and his affected limb was swollen. An x-ray was recommended and it found that he had a non-union on his fractured bone and he had to be admitted for hardware removal, as it was already infected. He went to the operating theater for infected hardware removal and antibiotic nailing was done in order to treat his infection.  Since the nail was not stable, a patella tendon-bearing cast was applied in order to immobilize his non-united fracture. He has been in and out of the hospital for frequent check-ups, change of dressing, and casts. The wound has not improved and at some time after the antibiotic nailing, he went to the operating room for debridement and vacuum-assisted closure of the wound to help in healing and daily dressing change has been done in a health facility near his home. He also suffered eye problems in between and can barely see at the moment. On Monday when he came for review, his wound was not well and had a foul smell. His hardware needs to be removed, the non-union has to be taken down and an ORIF procedure will be done for stability. He was prepared for admission, but then it was realized that he had exhausted his inpatient insurance limit. In order to save his leg, it is vital to perform the surgery immediately. William has no alternative way of paying for his procedure, which is very complex. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On December 7th, William will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. When treated, William will be able to walk normally and he will continue with farming to provide for his family. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1145 to fund this medical care. William says, "Spending most of the time in the hospital has been quite challenging. I cannot work or supervise my work as I did before because of my fractured limb. I am really looking forward to getting better in order to stabilize my family again. Please help me."

56% funded

56%funded
$642raised
$503to go
Patience

Patience is a primary school teacher from Uganda. Her husband also works as a teacher, and they have four children. Their oldest child is sixteen and in secondary class four, while their youngest is four and in the baby junior class at school. Patience shared that their combined income covers their children’s school fees but is limited in providing for their family’s needs. In addition to teaching, during her time off from the school year, Patience prepares and sells local sorghum porridge. Two years ago, Patience began to experience troubling symptoms, including swelling on her neck. While the swelling was initially painless, she started feeling neck pains as time went on. Currently, she experiences airway obstruction when she sleeps or raises her arms, and she can no longer carry heavy loads. Fortunately, Patience had a friend undergo thyroidectomy surgery at our medical partner’s care center, and they referred her for treatment. Patience’s condition was diagnosed as a non-toxic multinodular goiter. She needs to undergo surgery to prevent her symptoms from getting worse. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is helping Patience receive treatment. On January 3rd, she will undergo a thyroidectomy, during which surgeons will remove all or part of her thyroid gland. AMH is requesting $333 to fund this surgery. Patience shared: “I hope to get well and look normal again through surgery. I will resume teaching as soon as possible after complete recovery.”

0% funded

0%funded
$0raised
$333to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.