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Success! Alex from Kenya raised $646 to fund corrective surgery for his birth condition.

Alex
100%
  • $646 raised, $0 to go
$646
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Alex's treatment was fully funded on December 9, 2021.

Photo of Alex post-operation

December 16, 2021

Alex underwent corrective surgery for his birth condition.

Alex had a birth condition that put him at the risk of having his testicles damaged and other complications as he grows. He had a success surgery which completely healed his condition and reduced his risk of testicular cancer and future fertility problems.

Alex’s mother says, “We thank God for the successful procedure. With this, I am sure his confidence and his self-esteem will not be affected in the future.”

Alex had a birth condition that put him at the risk of having his testicles damaged and other complications as he grows. He had a success su...

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November 10, 2021

Alex is a bright and active 2-year-old. He never stops moving as we talk with his parents about their story. Alex is youngest in a family of two children. His sibling is five years. His father and mother are fruit vendors in Githurai Market in Nairobi, Kenya.

Alex was diagnosed with cryptorchidism, a condition in which one or both of the testicles remains undescended. If left untreated, Alex has an increased risk of developing hernias, testicular cancer, and fertility problems in the future.

Alex will be receiving assistance from our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation (AMHF). Fortunately, he is scheduled to undergo corrective surgery on November 11th. AMHF is requesting $646 to cover the total cost of his procedure and care.

Alex’s mother says, “I am afraid this condition will affect his confidence and his self-esteem in the future if not treated.”

Alex is a bright and active 2-year-old. He never stops moving as we talk with his parents about their story. Alex is youngest in a family o...

Read more

Alex's Timeline

  • November 10, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Alex was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare.

  • November 12, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Alex's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • November 25, 2021
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Alex received treatment at BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital (BKKH) in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • December 9, 2021
    FULLY FUNDED

    Alex's treatment was fully funded.

  • December 16, 2021
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Alex's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 9 donors

Funded by 9 donors

Treatment
Orchidopexy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $646 for Alex's treatment
Hospital Fees
$480
Medical Staff
$10
Medication
$30
Supplies
$90
Labs
$5
Other
$31
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

One of the testicles either appears to be missing or cannot be felt in the scrotum.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Left untreated, this condition can lead to infertility. The higher temperature inside the body can affect sperm production. Men with both testicles affected are more likely to experience fertility-related issues than men with only one affected testicle. This condition can also cause inguinal hernia, in which the intestine protrudes through a weakened area in the abdominal wall. Only surgery can correct this condition, which can otherwise result in intestinal damage or death. Finally, this condition is a risk factor for testicular cancer. If surgery is performed early, this risk is limited.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Undescended testis is the most common birth anomaly in boys. This condition is present in about 1-4.5% of newborns, with a higher incidence in premature babies (30-45%). Unilateral undescended testis is four times more likely than bilateral. Data on this condition is scarce in Kenya, so the true prevalence of acquired undescended testicles is still unknown.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After surgery, the patient will stay in the hospital for an average of three days. The patient is continually monitored.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Treatment will reduce the risk of infertility, inguinal hernia, and testicular cancer.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This condition is very treatable, and the procedure is low-risk.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality care centers in the region. Hospitals lack adequate resources and expertise to treat this condition.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

An alternative to surgery is to use synthetic hormones that encourage the testicle to move into the scrotum. Hormone therapy is only recommended if the child’s testicle(s) are close to the scrotum. However, hormone therapy is not commonly available in Kenya.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Saw Wah

Saw Wah is a 14-year-old grade six student from Burma. Saw Wah lives with his parents and five younger brothers in a village in Hpapun Township in Karen State where there is a lot of unrest currently. Saw Wah's father works as a day labourer when there is no work on the farm. Saw Wah's youngest brother is too young to enroll in school while his four other brothers stopped going to school this last year. Saw Wah shared, “They do not want to attend school because fighting happens very often in this area. We have to run and hide in the jungle where we study and they do not like to study in the jungle.” Saw Wah’s family also raises chickens and two goats for their own consumption. They also often go fishing and forage for vegetables in the jungle. Even though his family does not have a regular income, they can gather enough food. Saw Wah's family receives free basic healthcare at a free clinic near their village. Around 2018 or 2019, Saw Wah developed a runny nose with yellowish nasal discharge. At first, he thought that this was normal, and it would go away on its own. Towards the end of April 2022, Saw Wah nose became blocked, and he could no longer breath through his nose. He finally told his parents about his symptoms and his father took him to the free clinic at Ei Tu Hta Internally Displaced Camp. At the clinic, the medic checked Saw Wah's nostrils and told them that there is mass blocking the nasal passage in both of his nostrils. The medic also recommended Saw Wah go to a larger hospital for further investigation. At this time, Saw Wah has to breathe through his mouth which causes him discomfort. He has lost his sense of taste and smell, and has a hard time sleeping. Due to these symptoms, Saw Wah has had to stop his studies while he receives treatment. Saw Wah worries that it will take a while, and he will not be able to study this year. Fortunately, Saw Wah sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF). Now he is scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery on September 6th. BCMF is fundraising $1,500 to cover the cost of Saw Wah's procedure and care. Saw Wah shared, "I am excited to receive surgery and I hope that I will be able to breath through my nose after surgery."

68% funded

68%funded
$1,033raised
$467to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.