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Success! Ann from Kenya raised $1,500 to fund mass removal so she can live comfortably.

Ann
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Ann's treatment was fully funded on May 30, 2022.

Photo of Ann post-operation

June 9, 2022

Ann underwent mass removal so she can live pain-free.

Ann had a neck mass that needed urgent surgical attention. Although the tumor is non-cancerous, it was affecting her breathing, feeding, working, and sleeping. She was scheduled for an urgent right Carotid Body Tumor Excision (CBT) to cure her condition. She was financially constrained and called out for help.

Ann got the support she needed from the Watsi community. Surgery went as planned and was successful. She is expected to recover well and has no more planned surgeries. The medical team will continue to support and monitor her recovery.

Ann says, “I was at a point of despair. I am happy I got help and underwent the surgery. I can now take care of my kids.”

Ann had a neck mass that needed urgent surgical attention. Although the tumor is non-cancerous, it was affecting her breathing, feeding, wor...

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February 21, 2022

Ann is a 33-year-old single mother with two children— a 14-year-old and a one-year-old. She works at building sites whenever she can get small jobs to support her family. She and her children live in a single-room rental home.

In July 2021, Ann noticed a small lump on her neck that gradually grew more painful. She sought treatment at a local health facility and was diagnosed with a non-cancerous mass. The mass affects her breathing, along with her ability to eat, sleep, and work. She requires an urgent surgery called a CBT (carotid body tumor) excision. The procedure will help relieve her symptoms and prevent further tumor growth.

Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is helping Ann receive treatment. On February 23rd, she will undergo mass excision surgery at AMH’s care center. Now, she needs help raising $1,500 to fund her procedure and care.

Ann shared, “my kids are my source of joy. They rely on me for everything and this sickness is making it so hard for me to take care of them.”

Ann is a 33-year-old single mother with two children— a 14-year-old and a one-year-old. She works at building sites whenever she can get sma...

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Ann's Timeline

  • February 21, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Ann was submitted by Edward Mugane, Impact Assessment Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • February 23, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Ann received treatment at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • February 25, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Ann's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • May 30, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Ann's treatment was fully funded.

  • June 9, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Ann's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 31 donors

Treatment
Mass Excision; Open Reduction Internal Fixation
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $2,016 for Ann's treatment
Subsidies fund $516 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$1,545
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$65
Supplies
$225
Labs
$72
Other
$109
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The common symptoms of an ORIF include: extreme pain; inability and/or difficulty in using legs. Mass symptoms vary depending on the type of tumor. Not all tumors - cancerous or benign - show symptoms. A common benign tumor, such as a lipoma (fatty tumor), may cause local pressure and pain, or may be disfiguring and socially stigmatizing. This is mass excision followed by an open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) procedure. It is indicative for conditions such as ameloblastoma- a rare, benign tumor of odontogenic epithelium commonly appearing in the lower jaw. An ORIF corrects a severe, poorly aligned fracture where the ends of affected bones are far apart. Such a fracture may occur anywhere in the body (leg, hip, arm, jaw, etc.), usually as a result of trauma. Broadly, masses come in two types: benign (not cancer) and malignant (cancer). The types of tumors are many and could range from osteosarcoma of the jaw (a bone tumor) to thyroid enlargement to breast lump to fibroma (benign fat tumor), among others.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Without an ORIF, a non-union leads to chronic disability, pain, and inability to work. If the tumor is cancerous, it is usually aggressive and invasive. If not treated (like certain skin cancers, for example) there could be great tissue destruction, pain, deformity, and ultimately death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Because there are so many different kinds of masses, it is difficult to pinpoint certain cultural and/or regional causes.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient will generally stay in the hospital for 2-3 weeks after surgery, and return for a checkup in 6 weeks.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Curative. An ORIF fixes the broken bone restoring it to complete function and thus, enables the patient to be able to work. In the case of cancer, the procedure can be life-saving. In the case of benign tumors, patients can be free of pain or social stigma.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

In an ORIF, there is medium surgical risk. Overall, the risk of surgery is less than the risks of the alternative (traction), or doing nothing. In addition to the scenarios above, fractures may occur in older people with osteoporosis or because of cancer or infections like TB. In mass excision, if the tumor is cancerous, the surgeon will only try to remove it if the procedure would be curative. If the cancer has already spread, then surgery cannot help. Most of these surgeries are not very risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality orthopedic centres in developing countries. Any American would go to their local hospital and get an ORIF. There are few qualified facilities and surgeons to perform this procedure in Africa.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Traction is an alternative for some—but not all—cases. And traction requires a patient to be in the hospital, immobile, for months—leading not only to lost wages but risk of bedsores, blood clots, and hospital-acquired infections. It depends on the type of tumor. If the tumor is cancerous, chemotherapy may help, but that treatment is even less available than surgery. If the tumor is benign, it depends on the condition - but just watching the mass over time would be one option.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.