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Saravandira is a luminous 15-month-old baby from Haiti who needs $897 to fund a procedure to drain excess fluid from her brain.

Saravandira
39%
  • $355 raised, $542 to go
$355
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$542
to go
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August 26, 2022

Saravandira is a 15-month-old infant from Haiti. She has one older brother and sister and lives with both of her parents.

Saravandira has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. As a result of her condition, Saravandira’s head circumference has been increasing. Without treatment, Saravandira will experience severe physical and developmental delays.

Our medical partner, Project Medishare, is requesting $897 to cover the cost of surgery for Saravandira at Hospital Bernard Mevs that will treat her hydrocephalus. This is the only site in the country where this care is currently available and the procedure is scheduled to take place on August 26th. This critical treatment will drain the excess fluid from Saravandira’s brain to reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve her quality of life. With proper treatment, Saravandira will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young girl.

The family hopes that she can grow up and be healthy enough to play with her brother and sister.

Saravandira is a 15-month-old infant from Haiti. She has one older brother and sister and lives with both of her parents. Saravandira ha...

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Saravandira's Timeline

  • August 26, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Saravandira was submitted by Jennifer Rogers, Chief Nursing Officer at Project Medishare.

  • August 26, 2022
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Saravandira was scheduled to receive treatment at Hospital Bernard Mevs in Haiti. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • August 29, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Saravandira's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    Saravandira is currently raising funds for her treatment.

  • TBD
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Saravandira's treatment update from Project Medishare.

Funded by 12 donors

Funded by 12 donors

Treatment
Hydrocephalus ETV
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $897 for Saravandira's treatment
Hospital Fees
$357
Medical Staff
$100
Medication
$80
Supplies
$0
Labs
$10
Radiology
$350
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Families usually notice this condition with their child as their head grows large. These children do not reach normal developmental milestones and become unable to hold their head up, sit on their own, or talk. Some children become very irritable and become unable to suck and swallow so getting enough nutrition becomes difficult.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Children living with hydrocephaly are living with some form of brain damage that progresses as they get older. This damage will prevent them from developing on a normal trajectory. They have trouble eating, being able to sit, stand and communicate. Often they develop seizures and often experience pain and irritability. If it remains untreated, this condition will lead to death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

There is a lot of fear and stigma toward these patients as their heads grow large. Families with children who have hydrocephalus have trouble finding caregivers and support because of this fear. Also it is a financial burden to care for these children because of medication for seizures and the extra care they require as they grow older.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The treatment process involves a surgery to stop the extra fluid in the brain from accumulating and putting pressure on the brain. This is done by making a hole in part of the brain to drain the liquid (ETV). The patient usually spends one or two nights in the hospital and then goes home with a tiny incision in their head and abdomen.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This treatment is the only thing that will save the patient’s life. This treatment will prevent further brain damage. If it is caught early it allows the child to grow and develop fully. If it is caught late, the patient can receive therapy to assist them to overcome the developmental difficulties caused by the damage already done to their brain.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

The main complication caused by this surgery is simply that is does not work. In this case the child is given another surgery and a shunt is placed.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There is only one hospital in the country that performs surgeries for children with hydrocephaly. This hospital is in Port au Prince, Haiti. Children that live in the North or South of the country have to travel very far for clinic visits and surgery. This requires spending all day or several days on public transport to reach the hospital.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no current alternatives this treatment. If the brain damage is too far advanced then palliative care to treat the child’s pain and support the family is the only other option.

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