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Success! Elisa from the Philippines raised $826 to fund gallbladder removal surgery.

Elisa
100%
  • $826 raised, $0 to go
$826
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Elisa's treatment was fully funded on November 29, 2022.

Photo of Elisa post-operation

December 12, 2022

Elisa underwent gallbladder removal surgery.

Elisa is very excited to go home so she can start working again without feeling any pain and discomfort. Now that she had surgery, she is relieved she can finally return to helping her family with their living expenses.

Elisa shared, “I am so excited to go back to work without feeling any pain. I am very grateful to Watsi and World Surgical Foundation Philippines for sponsoring my treatment, and helping take away the pain in my body.”

Elisa is very excited to go home so she can start working again without feeling any pain and discomfort. Now that she had surgery, she is re...

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June 27, 2022

Elisa is a hardworking 37-year-old from the Philippines. She works as a coconut juice vendor, and her partner works different part-time jobs, both working to provide for their family.

Elisa has been experiencing abdominal pain and vomiting since 2018, but she decided to take herbal medicines as an alternative to provide temporary relief. However, her pain continued to intensify, so she checked herself into a nearby hospital. Her ultrasound test revealed that she has gallstones that need to be surgically removed. Due to financial constraints, her needed treatment was delayed, resulting in further damage to her health.

Fortunately, Elisa was referred to our medical partner, World Surgical Foundation Philippines (WSFP), and is now scheduled to undergo surgery to correct her condition on June 29th. A portion of the cost of her care is being supported by the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation and WSFP raising the remaining $826 to cover the cost of Elisa’s procedure.

“Every episode of pain hinders me from working and providing for my family. This surgery will be very beneficial to me,” Elisa shared. “Thank you, Watsi and World Surgical Foundation Philippines, for choosing me as one of your beneficiaries.”

Elisa is a hardworking 37-year-old from the Philippines. She works as a coconut juice vendor, and her partner works different part-time jobs...

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Elisa's Timeline

  • June 27, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Elisa was submitted by Abegail Joy Cervania, Marketing and Communications Officer at World Surgical Foundation Philippines.

  • June 28, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Elisa's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • June 29, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Elisa received treatment at Our Lady of Peace Hospital in Philippines. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • November 29, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Elisa's treatment was fully funded.

  • December 12, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Elisa's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 8 donors

Funded by 8 donors

Treatment
Cholecystectomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $826 for Elisa's treatment
Hospital Fees
$91
Medical Staff
$214
Medication
$91
Supplies
$284
Labs
$66
Radiology
$11
Other
$69
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Symptoms of cholecystitis may include severe pain in the upper right abdomen or center of your abdomen, pain that spreads to your right shoulder or back, and tenderness above your abdomen.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

The inability to predict when an attack of pain would occur will lead to the patients’ feelings of uncertainty and worry. Decreases in function levels at home and at work are common. Some patients have significant weight loss due to the fear of excruciating pain arising after eating.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

With surgical care becoming increasingly expensive, individuals with cholecystitis tend to put off surgery to focus on the daily needs of their family, which increases the risk for gallbladder rupture and other complications.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The gallbladder will be surgically removed.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Patients spend two or three days in the hospital recovering. Once at home, it may take four to six weeks to fully recover. After recovery, patients can resume their normal day-to-day activities and without the pain they previously had.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Complications that may arise include pain, fever higher than 38.3 degrees Celsius, vomiting that won't subside, foul-smelling or bloody drainage from the incision, or significant redness and swelling of the incision.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

The care facility is equipped and accessible to handle this procedure for patients only within limited regions in the country, including the capital city. World Surgical Foundation Philippines programs are known throughout the country so patients come from within Manila and other regions.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Patients may resort to natural remedies, such as gallbladder cleanses consisting of a blend of fruit juice, herbs, and oil. Others may also use apple cider vinegar instead of proper treatment to help their condition.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Janeth

Janeth is a two-year-old girl and the youngest in a family of two children. Her father is a small-scale farmer, while her mother has a few cattle whose milk she sells to buy food and other commodities. They also harvest and sell some of their crops to earn money. They are living in a harsh environment, but they try to manage on a day-to-day basis. Janeth was involved in an accident last year where she sustained severe burns. Her mother had made porridge for breakfast. She took the pot off the fire and placed it at a corner to cool down so that she could feed Janeth. As she went out to clean the plates Janeth took a cup and tried to take porridge by herself from the pot. She dipped her hand in the pot of hot porridge and while pulling her hand out, some of the porridge spilled on her left foot. Her mother ran inside when she heard Janeth crying, but she had already been badly burned. Her mother gave her first aid and rushed her to the nearest clinic where she got treatment that helped with the open wounds. The wounds have healed, but left her with scars that make her left-hand fingers hard to use, and the toe on her left food was disfigured. A relative who saw Janeth advised her mother to seek treatment at our medical partner's care center ALMC (The Plaster House). Janeth was diagnosed with burn scar contracture on her left hand and left foot. Her hand needs a release surgery with skin grafting because her fingers are webbed, and the fifth toe of her left foot needs to be amputated because it causes pain when she tries to wear shoes. Her mother cannot afford the $1,088 cost of treatment and is asking for help. Janeth’s mother says, "I had to convince my husband to let me come and seek treatment for our daughter. I am not at peace every time I think of her.”

66% funded

66%funded
$726raised
$362to go
William

William is a small-scale farmer from Kenya. He is a married man with twelve children. Some of his oldest children are married while others are still in school. William and his family live in a semi-permanent house. He has been a long-term potato farmer who has been growing them mainly for sale. His family has worked on their farm and it has contributed a lot to their income. Through the limited income William makes, he has been able to provide for his children's basic needs. William has medical insurance that he has been using throughout all his visits for inpatient and outpatient services for his medical procedures. In May 2019, when William was walking along the road, he was hit by a motorbike and he fell down, thus injuring his lower limb. Immediately, he was taken to a facility where he was admitted and surgery was done.  All was well up to last year when he started feeling unwell and decided to visit our partner's hospital. He presented with a lot of pain, he had a wound that was discharging pus, and his affected limb was swollen. An x-ray was recommended and it found that he had a non-union on his fractured bone and he had to be admitted for hardware removal, as it was already infected. He went to the operating theater for infected hardware removal and antibiotic nailing was done in order to treat his infection.  Since the nail was not stable, a patella tendon-bearing cast was applied in order to immobilize his non-united fracture. He has been in and out of the hospital for frequent check-ups, change of dressing, and casts. The wound has not improved and at some time after the antibiotic nailing, he went to the operating room for debridement and vacuum-assisted closure of the wound to help in healing and daily dressing change has been done in a health facility near his home. He also suffered eye problems in between and can barely see at the moment. On Monday when he came for review, his wound was not well and had a foul smell. His hardware needs to be removed, the non-union has to be taken down and an ORIF procedure will be done for stability. He was prepared for admission, but then it was realized that he had exhausted his inpatient insurance limit. In order to save his leg, it is vital to perform the surgery immediately. William has no alternative way of paying for his procedure, which is very complex. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On December 7th, William will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. When treated, William will be able to walk normally and he will continue with farming to provide for his family. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1145 to fund this medical care. William says, "Spending most of the time in the hospital has been quite challenging. I cannot work or supervise my work as I did before because of my fractured limb. I am really looking forward to getting better in order to stabilize my family again. Please help me."

56% funded

56%funded
$642raised
$503to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Janeth

Janeth is a two-year-old girl and the youngest in a family of two children. Her father is a small-scale farmer, while her mother has a few cattle whose milk she sells to buy food and other commodities. They also harvest and sell some of their crops to earn money. They are living in a harsh environment, but they try to manage on a day-to-day basis. Janeth was involved in an accident last year where she sustained severe burns. Her mother had made porridge for breakfast. She took the pot off the fire and placed it at a corner to cool down so that she could feed Janeth. As she went out to clean the plates Janeth took a cup and tried to take porridge by herself from the pot. She dipped her hand in the pot of hot porridge and while pulling her hand out, some of the porridge spilled on her left foot. Her mother ran inside when she heard Janeth crying, but she had already been badly burned. Her mother gave her first aid and rushed her to the nearest clinic where she got treatment that helped with the open wounds. The wounds have healed, but left her with scars that make her left-hand fingers hard to use, and the toe on her left food was disfigured. A relative who saw Janeth advised her mother to seek treatment at our medical partner's care center ALMC (The Plaster House). Janeth was diagnosed with burn scar contracture on her left hand and left foot. Her hand needs a release surgery with skin grafting because her fingers are webbed, and the fifth toe of her left foot needs to be amputated because it causes pain when she tries to wear shoes. Her mother cannot afford the $1,088 cost of treatment and is asking for help. Janeth’s mother says, "I had to convince my husband to let me come and seek treatment for our daughter. I am not at peace every time I think of her.”

66% funded

66%funded
$726raised
$362to go