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Derrick is a 25-year-old student from Uganda who needs $188 to fund mass removal surgery so he can perform his daily activities free of discomfort.

Derrick
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  • $20 raised, $168 to go
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August 15, 2022

Derrick is a 25-year-old student from Uganda who is pursuing his priesthood studies at a local Ugandan university. He is currently on holiday awaiting pastoral duties in September. Derrick is the youngest in a family of seven siblings. During his free time, he enjoys playing volleyball.

Derrick has dealt with a burning sensation around his pelvic area for a long time. He was diagnosed with varicocele, an enlargement of the veins within the scrotum. This condition causes him discomfort when he carries out many of his daily tasks and duties.

Fortunately, Derrick traveled to our medical partner’s care center, African Mission Healthcare, to receive treatment. On August 16th, surgeons will remove the mass. Now, he needs help to raise $188 to fund this procedure.

Derrick says, “I hope to get good health after my surgery because am really worried about my health.”

Derrick is a 25-year-old student from Uganda who is pursuing his priesthood studies at a local Ugandan university. He is currently on holida...

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Derrick's Timeline

  • August 15, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Derrick was submitted by Edward Mugane, Impact Assessment Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • August 16, 2022
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Derrick was scheduled to receive treatment at Karoli Lwanga Hospital, Nyakibale in Uganda. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • August 16, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Derrick's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • TODAY
    AWAITING FUNDING

    Derrick is currently raising funds for his treatment.

  • TBD
    AWAITING UPDATE

    Awaiting Derrick's treatment update from African Mission Healthcare.

Funded by 1 donor

Funded by 1 donor

Treatment
Mass Excision (Major)
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $188 for Derrick's treatment
Hospital Fees
$43
Medical Staff
$32
Medication
$12
Supplies
$45
Labs
$30
Other
$26
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Broadly speaking, masses come in two types: benign (not cancer) and malignant (cancer). The types of tumors are many and could range from osteosarcoma of the jaw (a bone tumor) to thyroid enlargement to breast lump to lipoma (benign fat tumor), among others. The symptoms vary depending on the type of tumor. Not all tumors, cancerous or benign, show symptoms. A common benign tumor, such as a lipoma (fatty tumor), may cause local pressure and pain, or may be disfiguring and socially stigmatizing. An ovarian mass may be benign or cancerous and may cause pain, bleeding, or, if malignant, even death.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

If the tumor is cancerous, it is usually aggressive and invasive. If not treated (including certain skin cancers, for example) there could be great tissue destruction, pain, deformity, and ultimately death.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Due to lack of accessibility to treatment facilities, some of the patients have lived with masses for a long time. Access to medical facilities is difficult for people living in remote parts of Uganda.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient is usually admitted to the hospital for three days. For major masses, the patient is operated under general anaesthesia and depending on the mass location and whether it is malignant or not, the surgery is approximately 3-5 hours long. After surgery, patients are continuously monitored in the hospital ward to ensure proper healing.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

In the case of cancer, the procedure can be life-saving. In the case of benign tumors, patients can be free of pain or social stigma.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

If the tumor is cancerous, the surgeon will only try to remove it if the procedure would be curative. If cancer has already spread, then surgery cannot help. Most of these surgeries are not classified as highly risky.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few qualified facilities and surgeons to perform this surgical procedure.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Alternatives depend on the type of tumor. If the tumor is cancerous, chemotherapy may help, but that treatment is even less available than surgery in this region. If the tumor is benign, it depends on the condition but monitoring the mass would be one option.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Mu

Mu is a 34-year-old wife and mother, living in Thailand. Mu lives with her husband, son, and two daughters in Mae Sot, Tak Province. Their family moved from Yangon, Burma to Thailand 14 years ago, in search of better job opportunities. Today, Mu is a homemaker, her son is a student, while her two daughters are still too young to study. Her husband is a dockworker in Mae Sot. Because their income is insufficient to cover their daily expenses, they sometimes have to borrow money from a neighbor. About two years ago, Mu developed a femoral hernia. Because of the hernia, Mu experiences severe pain in her left groin area, and she also has a lump that has been increasing in size, and which hangs down when she walks. Mu is very stressed about her condition, and because of chronic discomfort, she has been unable to keep up with her daily tasks. Fortunately, with the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Mu is scheduled for hernia repair surgery on October 27th, at Mae Sot General Hospital. Burma Children Medical Fund is seeking $1,500 to cover the cost of Mu's surgery and care, which should enable Mu to return to a life without the hardship she experiences now. Mu said: “I feel like I have to hold myself so this will not fall down when I walk, which makes me feel very uncomfortable. I want to receive surgery soon so that I can work to earn more money in the future. Now, my baby—our youngest daughter—is older so I will find a job after I have fully recovered from surgery.”

63% funded

63%funded
$950raised
$550to go
Mey Ching

Mey Ching comes from Banteay Meanchey province in Cambodia. She lives with her parents - her father is a cook and her mother is a factory worker. She has a 15-year-old brother in grade seven and a 13-year-old sister in grade four. Mey Ching should be in second grade but is not currently in school because of her disability. She stays at home and likes to paint, watch TV and sit outside with her parents. Since birth, Mey Ching has had a condition with both of her legs which have become increasingly bowing outward at her knees. She cannot walk far and is in pain when she does. This has prevented her from attending school and socializing with peers. Mey Ching's parents traveled eight hours to Children's Surgical Centre for a diagnosis and treatment. Doctors have tentatively diagnosed her with a condition found in children that affects the growth plates around the knee. The disease causes the growth plate near the inside of the knee to either slow down or stop making new bone. She will need an operation to correct both of her bowing tibias. If not treated, it can lead to progressive deformities of her legs however surgical treatment will correct her bowed legs. Mey Ching's family needs help to pay for this $521 procedure at CSC to save their daughter from permanent disability. Mey Ching's mother said: "We are so worried that Mey Ching will never walk or attend school. We are hopeful that the doctors at CSC can fix her legs so she can go to school and play with friends."

23% funded

23%funded
$120raised
$401to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Mu

Mu is a 34-year-old wife and mother, living in Thailand. Mu lives with her husband, son, and two daughters in Mae Sot, Tak Province. Their family moved from Yangon, Burma to Thailand 14 years ago, in search of better job opportunities. Today, Mu is a homemaker, her son is a student, while her two daughters are still too young to study. Her husband is a dockworker in Mae Sot. Because their income is insufficient to cover their daily expenses, they sometimes have to borrow money from a neighbor. About two years ago, Mu developed a femoral hernia. Because of the hernia, Mu experiences severe pain in her left groin area, and she also has a lump that has been increasing in size, and which hangs down when she walks. Mu is very stressed about her condition, and because of chronic discomfort, she has been unable to keep up with her daily tasks. Fortunately, with the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Mu is scheduled for hernia repair surgery on October 27th, at Mae Sot General Hospital. Burma Children Medical Fund is seeking $1,500 to cover the cost of Mu's surgery and care, which should enable Mu to return to a life without the hardship she experiences now. Mu said: “I feel like I have to hold myself so this will not fall down when I walk, which makes me feel very uncomfortable. I want to receive surgery soon so that I can work to earn more money in the future. Now, my baby—our youngest daughter—is older so I will find a job after I have fully recovered from surgery.”

63% funded

63%funded
$950raised
$550to go