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Success! Vun from Cambodia raised $487 to fund surgery that will help heal his arm.

Vun
100%
  • $487 raised, $0 to go
$487
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Vun's treatment was fully funded on October 28, 2022.

Photo of Vun post-operation

November 11, 2022

Vun underwent surgery that will help heal his arm.

It was difficult for Vun as the main provider of his family to lose his hands, but he has coped well because he has strong family support. At Children’s Surgical Centre he had a successful skin graft for his stump. The site is healing well, and the graft site has established new blood flow. He is hopeful the skin graft will heal well within several weeks, and he can learn to use his right arm to grasp objects. This will give him more independence and self-confidence.

Vun said: “I am grateful for the excellent care and glad I am alive to be with my family. I am amazed by the kindness of strangers willing to pay for my surgery, and I want to thank them and the CSC staff.”

It was difficult for Vun as the main provider of his family to lose his hands, but he has coped well because he has strong family support. A...

Read more
May 12, 2022

Vun is a 40-year-old construction worker who is married and has two daughters—a 13 year old and a 3 year old. Vun’s wife works in a garment factory. In his free time, Vun enjoys listening to the radio, spending time with his daughters, and watching TV.

In January, Vun was electrocuted in a workplace accident. His family took him to a hospital to have his wound dressed, and for a partial amputation of his left arm. These treatments cost the family $5,000. They shared with us that Vun had to leave the hospital when they ran out of money, even though he still needed additional care.

After visiting a Khmer traditional healer, Vun sought treatment at our medical partner, Children’s Surgical Centre, where he underwent a partial amputation of his right arm. His right arm was also modified, to enable Vun to be able to use it in his daily activities. The wound on his right arm remains open, however, and a skin graft is required in order for it to heal properly. Children’s Surgical Centre is seeking $487 to fund the skin graft procedure, which is scheduled for May 12th.

Vun says: “I hope after surgery my wound will heal and I can gain back some function of my right arm.”

Vun is a 40-year-old construction worker who is married and has two daughters—a 13 year old and a 3 year old. Vun's wife works in a garment...

Read more

Vun's Timeline

  • May 12, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Vun was submitted by Sieng Heng at Children's Surgical Centre.

  • May 12, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Vun received treatment at Kien Khleang National Rehabilitation Centre in Cambodia. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • May 16, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Vun's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • October 28, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Vun's treatment was fully funded.

  • November 11, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Vun's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 6 donors

Funded by 6 donors

Treatment
Skin Graft
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $487 for Vun's treatment
Hospital Fees
$126
Medical Staff
$310
Medication
$0
Supplies
$43
Labs
$3
Radiology
$5
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

A variety of injuries related to extensive skin loss can necessitate a skin graft. These include large open wounds, infection, and third degree burns. Additionally, surgeries such as removal of skin cancers require skin grafts to heal.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients who have injuries that are in need of a skin graft are in compromised health and at risk of infection from bacteria or viruses entering through the open wound.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Road traffic accidents— particularly with motorcycles—are a common cause of injuries in Cambodia and can often result in surgeries that involve a skin graft. The use of open stoves additionally can increase risk of burns, especially in children.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Skin grafting involves covering the affected area with healthy skin from a donor site. In a split-thickness skin graft, the top two layers of the donor skin, or the graft, are transplanted and attached by staples or stitches, and the donor-area is covered with a dressing. For injuries with deeper tissue loss, a full-thickness skin graft may be used, which transplants a full flap of skin, including the muscles and blood supply, and is a more complicated procedure. Prior to the skin transfer, debridement may be needed to remove dead or damaged skin. Following a skin graft surgery, patients will remain at the hospital for 1-2 weeks for follow-up care.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

By replacing damaged or missing skin with a skin graft, the patient’s risk of disease-causing bacteria or viruses entering the body are decreased; the graft also aids in fluid loss prevention and temperature regulation, improving the overall health of the patient.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

One risk of skin grafting is graft failure, caused commonly by blood collecting in the tissues, which necessitates a repeat graft. Other risks include infection, chronic pain, and wound contracture. Potential side effects are scarring, skin discoloration, or reduced skin sensation.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Injuries in need of skin grafts require surgical operation; affordable surgical care is not very accessible, and so patients travel as much as twelve hours to reach Children's Surgical Centre for free surgery, arriving by bus, motorbike, or taxi.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

The skin grafts performed at Children’s Surgical Centre are autographs, or grafts of the patient’s own skin. Alternatives to this include artificial skin grafts, which are used when patients do not have enough skin to cover the exposed area.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Tin

Tin is a 45-year-old man. Originally from Burma, he fled to Thailand over 20 years ago due to civil war. He currently lives with his wife, who works as a street vendor selling various snacks and vegetable, and one of his daughters, who is currently in school. His family also raises chickens, which they sell when they need cash. Tin previously worked as a farmer and a construction worker, but he has recently been unable to work due to his condition. In the future, he hopes to go back to work and help support his family. After an incident that occurred this past April that caused him to be hit in the left eye by a mango, Tin lost his vision in that eye and began to experience headaches, swelling, severe eye pain, and dizziness when attempting to stand. Tin eventually sought medical attention at a clinic. There, a medic checked his left eye, gave him a bottle of eye drops, and told him to seek treatment at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) since they could not treat him there. However, he did not go to MTC right away due to financial constraints. He instead hoped that his eye would recover over time with the help of eye drops. Although his pain was temporarily reduced, the bruising disappeared, and the swelling went down over time, he never regained his vision. The pain in his eye eventually returned, and he noticed that he had a white spot on his left pupil. As the white spot increased in size, his eye progressively became more painful and began to itch. He now experiences discharge and watering in his eye, as well as difficulty sleeping. At the beginning of this month, a small lump appeared near the white spot on his left pupil. The lump gradually increased in size until it bursted on August 13th. After the discharge and bleeding from the lump stopped, he asked his friend to take him to MTC right away. When he arrived at the clinic, he was told to come back on Monday since there were not any eye specialist medics working on the weekend. When Tin returned on Monday, a medic examined his left eye, and he was diagnosed with corneal perforation, a condition resulting from the cornea being penetrated and damaged. Tin was also told that his eye is infected. He now must undergo surgery at our medical partner's care center, Mae Sot General Hospital, to remove his left eye as quickly as possible before the infection spreads to his right eye. Fortunately, Tin was referred to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), for financial assistance accessing treatment. On August 17th, surgeons at our medical partner's care center will perform an enucleation to remove his left eye. Now, BCMF is requesting $1,500 to fund Tin's life-changing procedure. Tin shares, “I feel very depressed and worried about my eye. I can’t imagine what my life would be like if I lost vision in both of my eyes. I want to receive surgery quickly to prevent my right eye from becoming infected. Without your help, I don’t think I would be able to receive further treatment. Therefore, I want to say thank you to the donors and the organization for agreeing to support my treatment costs.”

69% funded

69%funded
$1,045raised
$455to go
Faith

Faith is a beautiful four-month-old baby from Kenya. She is the youngest of two children. To support their family, her mother is a stay-at-home mom, and her father herds and sells cattle. Faith was born at home with several congenital conditions. Her parents took her to a nearby facility for examination, where she was diagnosed with spina bifida, hydrocephalus, and clubfoot. They were referred to another facility where a medical device, called a shunt, was used to help treat the hydrocephalus, draining the excess fluid from her brain. On discharge, the hospital referred her and her family to our medical partner's care center, BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital, where Faith was examined and scheduled for spina bifida repair surgery. Spina bifida is a type of neural tube defect in which the spine does not properly close around the spinal cord. Without treatment, Faith is at risk of lower-limb paralysis, infection of the exposed nervous tissue, development of tethered cord syndrome, and possible developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,151 to cover the cost of Faith's spina bifida closure surgery. The surgery is scheduled to take place on July 13th. This procedure will hopefully spare Faith from the risks associated with her condition, instead allowing her to grow and develop along a healthy trajectory. Faith’s father says, “When I saw the problems that my child has, I was worried that she would never receive treatment. I am hopeful she will receive treatment with your help.”

80% funded

80%funded
$928raised
$223to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.