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Success! Naw Hser from Thailand raised $1,500 to fund a hysterectomy so she can live pain-free.

Naw Hser
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Naw Hser's treatment was fully funded on April 15, 2022.

Photo of Naw Hser post-operation

May 3, 2022

Naw Hser underwent a hysterectomy so she can finally live pain-free.

Naw Hser’s surgery was a success! Before undergoing treatment, she experienced many troubling symptoms, such as exhaustion, back and abdominal pain, poor appetite, weight loss, and an inability to sleep well. This caused Naw Hser and her family considerable stress. Since undergoing treatment, Naw Hser is happy to report that all of her symptoms are gone! She is able to look after her grandchildren and play with them without pain. She has also been able to resume her work and help around the house with cleaning and cooking, although her daughters still encourage her to rest as much as possible.

Naw Hser said, “Thank you very much for helping me. As we are refugees, I would never find the high amount of money to pay for my surgery. I pray for everyone who helped me receive this treatment. I am doing well now. I am 99% recovered and no longer have any old symptoms. Before I had severe back pain if I did any household chores but not anymore. Thank you very much to all the donors.”

Her youngest daughter also shared, “I couldn’t eat when my mother was in pain. I always worried that my mother would pass away. Now, we are all happy and very thankful to the doctors, organizations, and donors for helping my mother and saving her life.”

Naw Hser's surgery was a success! Before undergoing treatment, she experienced many troubling symptoms, such as exhaustion, back and abdomin...

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January 20, 2022

Naw Hser is a 47-year-old woman who lives with her older brother, her two daughters, two son-in-laws, two grandsons and one granddaughter in a refugee camp in Tak Province, Thailand. Everyone in Naw Hser’s family is currently unemployed since the outbreak of COVID-19 in late March 2020, when their refugee camp was placed under lockdown. Making things harder, the price of food has increased so the monthly 2,050 baht (approx. 68 USD) support they receive on a cash card is not enough to purchase necessities. By the end of each month, they have to purchase food from the shop on credit, which they try to pay back at the end of the month. They also grow vegetables in their neighbour’s garden, sharing the food they grow with them. This has made funding for medical care for their family very limited right now.

In early 2019, Naw Hser started to become very tired when she walked short distances. She also experiences back and lower abdominal pain almost every day. This has impacted her appetite and she has lost weight over the past year. She shared that she cannot sleep at night because of the pain and because of the stress she feels about her condition. She is worried it is not treatable and her family feels sad seeing her in pain.

Naw Hser has been diagnosed with uterine myoma. She has been advised by her doctor to undergo a total abdominal hysterectomy, the surgical removal of her uterus and cervix. If left untreated, Naw Hser’s symptoms will continue to worsen and put her at risk for further health complications in the future.

Fortunately, Naw Hser is scheduled to undergo her hysterectomy on January 25th. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Once recovered, she will no longer experience pain and she will be able to get back to more of her normal life. Once Naw Hser recovers, she is looking forward to being able to live happily with her family as she wishes.

Naw Hser said, “I want to live happily with my children and look after my grandchildren. Now, my daughters do not want me to cook or wash clothes for my grandchildren anymore. They want me to rest because of my condition. They really feel sad when they see me in pain and sometimes, I also cannot control my tears when I see them cry. I really want to have surgery to recover.”

Naw Hser is a 47-year-old woman who lives with her older brother, her two daughters, two son-in-laws, two grandsons and one granddaughter in...

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Naw Hser's Timeline

  • January 20, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Naw Hser was submitted by Bue Wah Say, Project Officer at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • January 24, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Naw Hser's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • January 25, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Naw Hser received treatment at Mae Sot General Hospital in Thailand. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • April 15, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Naw Hser's treatment was fully funded.

  • May 3, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Naw Hser's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Treatment
Total Abdominal Hysterectomy
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $3,416 for Naw Hser's treatment
Subsidies fund $1,916 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$2,216
Medical Staff
$493
Medication
$67
Supplies
$87
Labs
$22
Radiology
$8
Other
$523
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients may experience a sensation of heaviness in the pelvis, tissue protrusion from a sensitive area, urinary and bowel dysfunction, and lower back pain.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Patients may experience intermittent pain in the abdomen and spotting. If the pain becomes debilitating and chronic, patients may be unable to participate in daily life. It may be difficult for women to care for their families, complete household tasks, and work.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Because of the sensitive nature of gynecological conditions, patients may delay seeking care. Many patients do not have the means to travel or pay for surgery or are not able to take time away from their family and work to seek treatment.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

The patient undergoes blood testing and an ultrasound scan to confirm the diagnosis. If the patient does not have any other medical conditions, surgery can be performed quickly. If the patient has another health condition, such as high blood pressure or diabetes, its symptoms must be managed before surgery. A patient usually spends about 4-5 days in the hospital.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

This treatment can completely change a patient’s life. After the surgery, the patient will see her condition and symptoms improve. Pain, fatigue, menstruation abnormalities, and urinary dysfunction will be alleviated.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Side effects can include fever, infection, heavy bleeding during or after surgery, injury to the urinary tract or nearby organs, blood clots, problems related to anesthesia, and death.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Although this type of treatment is available in most of Burma, patients cannot access care because of the high cost of surgery.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are not many alternatives, especially for women who are older. Doctors will suggest this treatment to reduce the chance of recurrence of masses/cysts/myoma. Some women opt to treat the symptoms with pain medicine or traditional medicine. Ultimately, however, mass removal or a hysterectomy are the only options to resolve the condition and improve the symptoms.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Tin

Tin is a 45-year-old man. Originally from Burma, he fled to Thailand over 20 years ago due to civil war. He currently lives with his wife, who works as a street vendor selling various snacks and vegetable, and one of his daughters, who is currently in school. His family also raises chickens, which they sell when they need cash. Tin previously worked as a farmer and a construction worker, but he has recently been unable to work due to his condition. In the future, he hopes to go back to work and help support his family. After an incident that occurred this past April that caused him to be hit in the left eye by a mango, Tin lost his vision in that eye and began to experience headaches, swelling, severe eye pain, and dizziness when attempting to stand. Tin eventually sought medical attention at a clinic. There, a medic checked his left eye, gave him a bottle of eye drops, and told him to seek treatment at Mae Tao Clinic (MTC) since they could not treat him there. However, he did not go to MTC right away due to financial constraints. He instead hoped that his eye would recover over time with the help of eye drops. Although his pain was temporarily reduced, the bruising disappeared, and the swelling went down over time, he never regained his vision. The pain in his eye eventually returned, and he noticed that he had a white spot on his left pupil. As the white spot increased in size, his eye progressively became more painful and began to itch. He now experiences discharge and watering in his eye, as well as difficulty sleeping. At the beginning of this month, a small lump appeared near the white spot on his left pupil. The lump gradually increased in size until it bursted on August 13th. After the discharge and bleeding from the lump stopped, he asked his friend to take him to MTC right away. When he arrived at the clinic, he was told to come back on Monday since there were not any eye specialist medics working on the weekend. When Tin returned on Monday, a medic examined his left eye, and he was diagnosed with corneal perforation, a condition resulting from the cornea being penetrated and damaged. Tin was also told that his eye is infected. He now must undergo surgery at our medical partner's care center, Mae Sot General Hospital, to remove his left eye as quickly as possible before the infection spreads to his right eye. Fortunately, Tin was referred to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), for financial assistance accessing treatment. On August 17th, surgeons at our medical partner's care center will perform an enucleation to remove his left eye. Now, BCMF is requesting $1,500 to fund Tin's life-changing procedure. Tin shares, “I feel very depressed and worried about my eye. I can’t imagine what my life would be like if I lost vision in both of my eyes. I want to receive surgery quickly to prevent my right eye from becoming infected. Without your help, I don’t think I would be able to receive further treatment. Therefore, I want to say thank you to the donors and the organization for agreeing to support my treatment costs.”

69% funded

69%funded
$1,045raised
$455to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.