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Success! Edwin from Tanzania raised $880 to fund surgery so he can grow up healthy and active.

Edwin
100%
  • $880 raised, $0 to go
$880
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Edwin's treatment was fully funded on January 27, 2022.

Photo of Edwin post-operation

March 14, 2022

Edwin underwent surgery so he can grow up healthy and active.

Edwin has a successful surgery to correct both of his legs that were making it hard to walk. He had pain and was tired even from going a short distance.

As he grows up, Edwin will now walk with ease and can live a full life just like other kids he knows. Edwin’s mother shared: “Thank you for saving my son from all the suffering he was going through due to his legs. God bless you.”

Edwin has a successful surgery to correct both of his legs that were making it hard to walk. He had pain and was tired even from going a sho...

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December 31, 2021

Edwin is a young boy from Tanzania and the youngest in his family of three children. He is a friendly and playful boy. Edwin’s parents are small-scale farmers who mainly grow food crops like maize, potatoes, and vegetables.

Edwin was diagnosed with genu varus, where his legs bow outward at the knee. This condition is typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, he has difficulty walking and running with his agemates.

Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery for Edwin. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 4th. Treatment will hopefully restore Edwin’s mobility, allow him to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease his risk of future complications.

Edwin’s mother says “We don’t like seeing his legs this way and the struggle he has in walking. It is because of financial challenges that we haven’t been able to seek treatment for him.”

Edwin is a young boy from Tanzania and the youngest in his family of three children. He is a friendly and playful boy. Edwin’s parents are s...

Read more

Edwin's Timeline

  • December 31, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Edwin was submitted by Joan Kadagaya, Curative Medical Support Program-Partner Representative at African Mission Healthcare.

  • January 4, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Edwin's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • January 18, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Edwin received treatment at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre (ALMC) in Tanzania. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • January 27, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Edwin's treatment was fully funded.

  • March 14, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Edwin's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 20 donors

Funded by 20 donors

Treatment
Fluorosis - Genu Valgus / Varus
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $880 for Edwin's treatment
Hospital Fees
$831
Medical Staff
$15
Medication
$11
Supplies
$0
Labs
$23
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients with genu valgum (or "knock-knees") have knees that bend inward and cause an abnormal walking gait. Patients with genu varum (or bowleggedness) have knees that bend outward and cause knee or hip pain and reduced range of motion in the hips.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

The patient's mobility is hindered, which can prevent the patient from making a living through physical labor. The patient may also develop arthritis later in life.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

In the United States, supplemental fluoride is added to the water to improve dental health. However, in areas of northern Tanzania, there is too much naturally-occurring fluoride in the water, which causes bone curvature.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

After surgery, the patient will stay in the hospital for 4-5 days. During this time, the surgical wound will be monitored for swelling and infection. The patient will complete physiotherapy to help him or her walk or move the limbs. A series of X-rays will be performed over several months to monitor the healing process.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The bones and joints will be aligned, and long-term disability will be prevented.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This procedure is not risky, but it is time-consuming. The rehabilitation process can take several months.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Care is not easily accessible. Most patients live in remote, rural areas and are identified through mobile outreach. The pediatric surgical program at Arusha Lutheran Medical Centre was started to meet the large burden of pediatric disability in the region.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. Although some cases can heal on their own, the patients submitted to Watsi require dedicated treatment.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Lwin

Lwin is a 37-year-old wife and mother who lives with her husband and son on the Thai-Burma border. Lwin and her husband work as day labourers in a temple as a cook and gardener. In her free time, Lwin likes to garden and enjoys growing vegetables to eat and to donate to the temple. Lwin also likes to watch Thai movies. One night in March 2021, Lwin had a rapid heartbeat and felt dizzy. Lwin could not sleep that night so her husband brought her to a clinic the next day. The doctor referred her to Mae Sot Hospital in an ambulance, where she underwent diagnostic tests, but never received a diagnosis. Lwin was given medication to stabilize her condition. During her follow-up appointment in June 2022, Lwin received an echocardiogram and was diagnosed with mitral valve stenosis. The doctor then referred her to Chiang Mai Hospital for further treatment. Currently, Lwin suffers from shortness of breath and heart palpitations. Lwin reports her arms and legs feeling heavy and trouble sleeping. Lwin has little appetite and she has to sleep propped up on pillows. On January 13th, Lwin with receive surgery to improve her condition. Our medical partners, Burma Children Medical Fund, are helping Lwin raise $1,500 to cover the cost of this life altering surgery. Lwin shared, "I will never forget the donors who will help pay for my treatment cost. When I recover fully, I want to learn how to sew so that I can open a shop from my home and work as a seamstress."

51% funded

51%funded
$768raised
$732to go
Aye

Aye is a 47-year-old mother, living with her daughter in Thailand. Up until four months ago, Aye worked as a day laborer on a farm. Because she has had to stop working, Aye's daughter left school, and now works as a nanny to help support her mother. Aye's siblings have also stepped up to support their sister. Five years ago, Aye began to experience pain on the left side of her body. She also developed a fever and vomiting, lost her appetite, and found it difficult to sleep. In addition, she experienced night sweats and a stiff neck. Aye was treated by a local health worker, and for a while, she felt better. However, in June 2021, her symptoms worsened, and she went to Mae Tao Clinic (MTC), where she was told to go to the hospital. Due to a lack of funds, Aye could not go to the hospital, and was treated at a local clinic, instead. In April 2022, Aye's symptoms returned, and she went back to Mae Tao Clinic, where she was diagnosed with stones in her left kidney. This time she did go the hospital, where she was told that she would need to have surgery, to remove the stones from her kidney. Thanks to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Aye is scheduled for surgery to remove the kidney stones on October 3rd, at Mae Sot General Hospital. After she has recovered, Aye should be able to return to her work and to enjoying her life, free from all of her uncomfortable symptoms. Aye and her family need your help to cover the $1,500 needed to pay for her surgery. Aye said: "I am happy that I will be able to receive surgery through donors. Thank you so much for saving my life.”

72% funded

72%funded
$1,088raised
$412to go
Ly Hor

Ly Hor is a 13-year-old curious student. He comes from Tboung Khmum province in the central lowlands of the Mekong river. He has two sisters - his older sister is 19 and is a factory worker, and his younger sister is six and studies in grade one. His parents are farmers and grow rainy-day rice and vegetables. Ly Hor attends grade 7 in public school. His favorite subjects are math and physical education. In the future, he would like to be a doctor. At home, he enjoys playing football, reading books, doing homework with friends, and helping his family with the vegetable gardens. He loves it when his mom makes fried rice or fried noodles, which he enjoys eating with fresh milk. In October, Ly Hor injured his right elbow when playing football by stretching out his hand to break a fall. His mother took him to a Khmer traditional healer because she could not afford the care at a government hospital. He has chronic pain, and his elbow has become swollen and deformed. He is unable to use his hand due to swelling and pain. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner, Children's Surgical Centre, can help. On December 7th, Ly Hor will undergo a fracture repair procedure, which will cost $483. This procedure will repair the fracture, and Ly Hor will be able to use his arm again. Ly Hor's mother said: "He is very sad now because he cannot do anything with his friends. I hope the doctors can fix his arm so he won't be in pain, and he can be active again with his friends in school."

10% funded

10%funded
$50raised
$433to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Lwin

Lwin is a 37-year-old wife and mother who lives with her husband and son on the Thai-Burma border. Lwin and her husband work as day labourers in a temple as a cook and gardener. In her free time, Lwin likes to garden and enjoys growing vegetables to eat and to donate to the temple. Lwin also likes to watch Thai movies. One night in March 2021, Lwin had a rapid heartbeat and felt dizzy. Lwin could not sleep that night so her husband brought her to a clinic the next day. The doctor referred her to Mae Sot Hospital in an ambulance, where she underwent diagnostic tests, but never received a diagnosis. Lwin was given medication to stabilize her condition. During her follow-up appointment in June 2022, Lwin received an echocardiogram and was diagnosed with mitral valve stenosis. The doctor then referred her to Chiang Mai Hospital for further treatment. Currently, Lwin suffers from shortness of breath and heart palpitations. Lwin reports her arms and legs feeling heavy and trouble sleeping. Lwin has little appetite and she has to sleep propped up on pillows. On January 13th, Lwin with receive surgery to improve her condition. Our medical partners, Burma Children Medical Fund, are helping Lwin raise $1,500 to cover the cost of this life altering surgery. Lwin shared, "I will never forget the donors who will help pay for my treatment cost. When I recover fully, I want to learn how to sew so that I can open a shop from my home and work as a seamstress."

51% funded

51%funded
$768raised
$732to go