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Patrick from Kenya raised $1,079 to fund fracture repair surgery so that he can walk easily again.

Patrick
100%
  • $1,079 raised, $0 to go
$1,079
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Patrick's treatment was fully funded on January 8, 2022.
April 1, 2022

Patrick underwent fracture repair surgery but did not require our funding support.

We received an update from our medical partner that we wanted to share with you about Patrick. His fracture repair was scheduled, however his mother shared an update that the owner of the motorbike that hit him took him to another hospital for treatment. He is now recovering well and his family is hopeful that you can support another patient in need.

We received an update from our medical partner that we wanted to share with you about Patrick. His fracture repair was scheduled, however hi...

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December 22, 2021

Patrick is a 31-year-old laborer and the fourth born child in a family of eight children. He grew up with his mother and siblings, and sadly, his father passed away when he and his siblings were young. He is married and he and his wife have three children, including two children in public primary school and another who is not yet school aged. He makes a living by digging and weeding on farms. His wife works as a casual laborer, but currently stays at home with their youngest child. The family has a small piece of land where they grow maize, beans, and potatoes for the family’s consumption.

Recently, Patrick was hit by a motorbike. He injured his right foot in the accident and was taken to a local clinic where an x-ray was taken and a cast was applied. However, over the next few days, his leg became swollen and he was in pain, so he visited a hospital for further evaluation. He was diagnosed with a complex distal tibia fracture and requires surgery. He is currently using crutches because walking is difficult.

Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), can help. On December 23rd, Patrick will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. This procedure will help the fracture in his leg to heal properly. After his foot heals, he will be able to return to work. Now, he needs help raising $1,079 to fund his procedure and care.

Patrick shared, “I kindly ask for treatment so that I can go back to my daily activities for I’m the breadwinner for my family.”

Patrick is a 31-year-old laborer and the fourth born child in a family of eight children. He grew up with his mother and siblings, and sadly...

Read more

Patrick's Timeline

  • December 22, 2021
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Patrick was submitted by Edward Mugane, Impact Assessment Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • December 23, 2021
    TREATMENT SCHEDULED

    Patrick was scheduled to receive treatment at Maua Methodist Hospital in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • December 25, 2021
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Patrick's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • April 1, 2022
    FUNDING ENDED

    Patrick is no longer raising funds.

  • April 1, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Patrick's treatment did not happen. Read the update.

Funded by 19 donors

Funded by 19 donors

Treatment
ORIF (IM Nailing)
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $1,079 for Patrick's treatment
Hospital Fees
$195
Medical Staff
$0
Medication
$186
Supplies
$646
Other
$52
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

The common symptoms include: extreme pain; inability/difficulty in using limbs; deformity of a limb. This procedure corrects a severe, poorly aligned fracture where the ends of affected bones are far apart. Such a fracture may occur anywhere in the body (leg, hip, arm, jaw, etc.), usually as a result of trauma.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

A non-union leads to chronic disability, pain, and inability to work.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Car/motorcycle/taxi accidents are the number one cause of this type of condition. Work-related accidents and violence are others. Yes, it is more common largely because African roads are among some of the most dangerous in the world.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Please refer to the AMH treatment process document.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Curative. An ORIF fixes the broken bone restoring it to complete function and thus, enabling the patient to be able to work and have a productive and high-quality life.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Medium surgical risk but most trauma patients are young and tolerate the procedure well. Overall, the risk of surgery is less than the risks of the alternative (traction), or doing nothing. There is a risk of the metal becoming infected, which would require antibiotics and perhaps removal of the hardware and a second surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality orthopedic centers in developing countries. In the developed world, any patient would go to their local hospital and get this procedure. Often patients have received initial care for a fracture at another hospital and may have been placed in “traction.” “Traction” involves placing the affected limb in a cast under tension for prolonged periods to try to re-align the bones. Those who have funds try to make their way to a regional/referral hospital or hospital that is well known for higher-quality care. Most patients seen in Watsi Medical Partner's Care Centers who are in need of an ORIF are mainly patients who have been not been helped in other hospitals. Usually, those hospitals lack adequate resources and expertise to treat them.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

Traction is an alternative for some—but not all—cases. And traction requires a patient to be in the hospital, immobile, for months—leading not only to lost wages but risk of bedsores, blood clots, and hospital-acquired infections.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.