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Success! K from Burma raised $1,500 to fund cataract surgery and restore her vision.

K
100%
  • $1,500 raised, $0 to go
$1,500
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
K's treatment was fully funded on May 3, 2022.

Photo of K post-operation

May 11, 2022

K underwent cataract surgery to restore her vision.

K’s surgery was a success! She shared that her life has significantly changed since undergoing her procedure. Before, K could not see objects or people’s faces, which made it difficult for her to walk, and she experienced terrible headaches. As a result, K was unable to weave her traditional Karen shirts. Now, after undergoing surgery, K can see clearly, no longer worries about being able to walk, and her headaches are finally gone. K is overjoyed with the results and looks forward to returning to weaving and helping around the house with cleaning and cooking once she is fully recovered. Until then, K is enjoying helping her husband to water the vegetables in their garden.

K said, “Thank you very much for helping me. I can see very well now. I have no money to pay for my own treatment. I am very happy, and all my family are happy with me that I can see again.”

K’s surgery was a success! She shared that her life has significantly changed since undergoing her procedure. Before, K could not see object...

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February 16, 2022

K is a 46-year-old homemaker from Burma. K lives with her husband, son and two daughters in a refugee camp. K and her husband are small scale vegetable farmers. K’s eldest daughter is a nurse in the refugee camp’s hospital, while her other daughter and son are students. In her free time, K enjoys cleaning her house and weaving traditional Karen shirts.

K has a cataract in her left eye that causes blurred vision. K’s challenged vision has prevented her from weaving, and causes her to walk slowly so she does not get injured. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to help fund K’s lens replacement surgery on February 16th. After recovery, K will be able to see clearly again.

K shared, “After surgery, when I can see again, I hope to go back to weaving and helping with all the household chores.”

K is a 46-year-old homemaker from Burma. K lives with her husband, son and two daughters in a refugee camp. K and her husband are small scal...

Read more

K's Timeline

  • February 16, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    K was submitted by Bridgitte Agocs at Burma Children Medical Fund.

  • February 16, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    K received treatment at Mae Sot General Hospital in Thailand. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • February 20, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    K's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • May 3, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    K's treatment was fully funded.

  • May 11, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    K's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 31 donors

Funded by 31 donors

Treatment
Lens Replacement
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $3,505 for K's treatment
Subsidies fund $2,005 and Watsi raises the remaining $1,500
Hospital Fees
$1,597
Medical Staff
$501
Medication
$186
Supplies
$1,020
Labs
$30
Other
$171
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

Patients may experience blurred or dim vision, shadows or blind spots in the field of vision, sensitivity to light and glare, and double vision.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

Reduced vision can result in social isolation, depression, increased risk of falling and accidents, and ultimately a greater tendency to be disabled. Without surgery, the patient will have no choice but to live with end-stage ocular disease, often resulting in blindness or pain.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

The healthcare system in Burma does not permit the average citizen to receive proper eye examinations. This lack of attention to ocular health is due to a variety of reasons. However, a low optometrist-to-population ratio and insufficient funds are the leading causes.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

Surgery will only be performed if the pressure in the eye is stable. The time it takes to stabilize the pressure in the eye depends on the severity of damage to the eye.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

The patient will regain his or her vision, though it may not be perfectly clear. Fortunately, the surgery prevents a complete loss of vision.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

Potential side effects include bleeding, infection, scarring, persistent swelling, wound separation, and the need to undergo additional surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

Burma has 309 ophthalmologists and 150 eye nurses. Fewer than half of the ophthalmologists perform surgery, and almost two-thirds confine their practice to the cities of Yangon (with a population of about six million) and Mandalay (about three million), where many people have the financial capacity to meet high out-of-pocket healthcare expenses. Aside from these main facilities, there is roughly one ophthalmologist for every 500,000 people, and eye health screening and treatment for children and adults is neither comprehensive nor consistent.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

There are no alternatives. If left untreated, the patient will eventually lose his or her vision completely.

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30% funded

30%funded
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Titus

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0% funded

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Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Irine

Irine is a hardworking 76-year-old grandmother and widow from Kenya. She lives in a semi-permanent house and works as a small-scale farmer, growing food to feed herself. She receives other basic necessities from her children. Irine's home is located in an area with many hills, which become very slippery when it rains. One rainy day, Irine was doing her daily duties when she unfortunately slipped and fell. As she fell on the side of her hip, the load she was carrying also fell on top of her. She could not get up or move due to her right lower limb being in pain. Since she was home alone, she had to shout for help, and a neighbor eventually came to her rescue. A family member later took her to a hospital, where she was diagnosed with a fracture of her right femur. Irene currently experiences pain and is unable to use her leg. Although she was previously among the beneficiaries who received health insurance paid for by the government, the government eventually stopped providing payment. This meant Irine had to pay for her own monthly bill, a cost she could not provide. Due to financial constraints and not having insurance, Irine cannot fund her needed treatment. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On August 2nd, Irine will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. After the surgery, she will hopefully be able to walk and care for herself again. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,247 to fund this procedure. Irine says, "I know how my children struggle to earn a living. Kindly help me so that I may not be a burden to them.”

50% funded

50%funded
$631raised
$616to go