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Success! Colleta from Kenya raised $979 to fund fracture repair surgery so she can walk again.

Colleta
100%
  • $979 raised, $0 to go
$979
raised
$0
to go
Fully funded
Colleta's treatment was fully funded on September 26, 2022.

Photo of Colleta post-operation

October 5, 2022

Colleta underwent fracture repair surgery so she can walk again.

Colleta and her family were in a serious car accident, and Colleta fractured her right pelvic bones. Her fracture repair surgery was a success, and she is already seeing the results. Before surgery, Colleta could not sit, but now she can sit on her bed and has started physiotherapy sessions. Colleta is recovering well and hopes that, together with her family, she will recover fully.

Colleta said, “I have seen God’s hand. Today, it is a miracle that my kids are alive although I lost three family members. I am also lucky to be alive and now assured that I could walk again. We thank God.”

Colleta and her family were in a serious car accident, and Colleta fractured her right pelvic bones. Her fracture repair surgery was a succe...

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April 27, 2022

Colleta is a 26-year-old woman who works at a small boutique in Nairobi. She is married and has two children, who are four-years-old and five-months-old. Colleta and her family currently live in the capital city, but they plan to relocate to Colleta’s hometown soon.

Colletta and her family were involved in a serious car accident last month. Her parents and brother passed away, and her husband and two children were seriously injured and admitted to the ICU. Although her husband’s condition has stabilized, Colleta’s kids are in critical condition and under pediatric intensive care. Colletta sustained a fracture to her right pelvic bones. As a result, she experiences severe pain and cannot sit, turn her body, or feed herself.

Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), can help Colletta receive treatment. On April 28th, she will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation, that will allow her to sit and walk again. AMH is requesting $979 to fund this procedure.

Colleta shared, “I am in pain and cannot even turn or sit. I am also sad that I lost my parents and my brother. My kids and husband are in critical care and still in ICU. I feel confused and heartbroken.”

Colleta is a 26-year-old woman who works at a small boutique in Nairobi. She is married and has two children, who are four-years-old and fiv...

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Colleta's Timeline

  • April 27, 2022
    PROFILE SUBMITTED

    Colleta was submitted by Robert Kariuki, Process Coordinator at African Mission Healthcare.

  • April 29, 2022
    TREATMENT OCCURRED

    Colleta received treatment at AIC Kijabe Hospital in Kenya. Medical partners often provide care to patients accepted by Watsi before those patients are fully funded, operating under the guarantee that the cost of care will be paid for by donors.

  • April 29, 2022
    PROFILE PUBLISHED

    Colleta's profile was published to start raising funds.

  • September 26, 2022
    FULLY FUNDED

    Colleta's treatment was fully funded.

  • October 5, 2022
    TREATMENT UPDATE

    Colleta's treatment was successful. Read the update.

Funded by 27 donors

Funded by 27 donors

Treatment
ORIF Mandible/Simple
  • Cost Breakdown
  • Diagnosis
  • Procedure
On average, it costs $979 for Colleta's treatment
Hospital Fees
$688
Medical Staff
$29
Medication
$27
Supplies
$172
Labs
$16
Other
$47
  • Symptoms
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Cultural or regional significance

​What kinds of symptoms do patients experience before receiving treatment?

This procedure corrects a severe, poorly aligned fracture where the ends of affected bones are far apart. Such a fracture may occur anywhere in the body (leg, hip, arm, jaw, etc) usually as a result of trauma. Common symptoms include extreme pain, inability/difficulty in using limbs, and deformed limbs.

​What is the impact on patients’ lives of living with these conditions?

A non-union leads to chronic disability, pain, and inability to work.

What cultural or regional factors affect the treatment of these conditions?

Car/motorcycle taxi accidents are the number one cause. Work-related accidents and violence are others. The condition is more common largely because African roads (particularly Kenyan roads, where this procedure is approved) are among some of the most dangerous in the world.

  • Process
  • Impact on patient's life
  • Risks and side-effects
  • Accessibility
  • Alternatives

What does the treatment process look like?

In general, an ORIF (open-reduction internal-fixation) procedure uses rods or plates to bring multiple parts of bone together and help them heal correctly.

What is the impact of this treatment on the patient’s life?

Curative. An ORIF fixes the broken bone, restoring it to complete function and enabling the patient to be able to work.

What potential side effects or risks come with this treatment?

This procedure has medium surgical risk but most trauma patients are young and tolerate the procedure well. Overall, the risk of surgery is less than the risks of the alternative (traction), or doing nothing. There is a risk of the metal becoming infected, which would require antibiotics and perhaps removal of the hardware and a second surgery.

How accessible is treatment in the area? What is the typical journey like for a patient to receive care?

There are few quality orthopedic centers in developing countries. Often patients have received initial care for a fracture at another hospital and may have been placed in “traction.” This involves placing the affected limb in a cast under tension for prolonged periods to try to re-align the bones. Those who have funds try to make their way to a place like Kijabe Hospital. Most patients seen in Kijabe who are in need of an ORIF are patients who have been mismanaged in other hospitals. Usually, those hospitals lack adequate resources and expertise to treat them.

What are the alternatives to this treatment?

As mentioned, traction is an alternative for some — but not all — cases. And traction requires a patient to be in the hospital, immobile, for months — leading not only to lost wages but risk of bedsores, blood clots, and hospital-acquired infections.

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Patience

Patience is a primary school teacher from Uganda. Her husband also works as a teacher, and they have four children. Their oldest child is sixteen and in secondary class four, while their youngest is four and in the baby junior class at school. Patience shared that their combined income covers their children’s school fees but is limited in providing for their family’s needs. In addition to teaching, during her time off from the school year, Patience prepares and sells local sorghum porridge. Two years ago, Patience began to experience troubling symptoms, including swelling on her neck. While the swelling was initially painless, she started feeling neck pains as time went on. Currently, she experiences airway obstruction when she sleeps or raises her arms, and she can no longer carry heavy loads. Fortunately, Patience had a friend undergo thyroidectomy surgery at our medical partner’s care center, and they referred her for treatment. Patience’s condition was diagnosed as a non-toxic multinodular goiter. She needs to undergo surgery to prevent her symptoms from getting worse. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), is helping Patience receive treatment. On January 3rd, she will undergo a thyroidectomy, during which surgeons will remove all or part of her thyroid gland. AMH is requesting $333 to fund this surgery. Patience shared: “I hope to get well and look normal again through surgery. I will resume teaching as soon as possible after complete recovery.”

0% funded

0%funded
$0raised
$333to go

Meet another patient you can support

100% of your donation funds life-changing surgery.

Mey Ching

Mey Ching comes from Banteay Meanchey province in Cambodia. She lives with her parents - her father is a cook and her mother is a factory worker. She has a 15-year-old brother in grade seven and a 13-year-old sister in grade four. Mey Ching should be in second grade but is not currently in school because of her disability. She stays at home and likes to paint, watch TV and sit outside with her parents. Since birth, Mey Ching has had a condition with both of her legs which have become increasingly bowing outward at her knees. She cannot walk far and is in pain when she does. This has prevented her from attending school and socializing with peers. Mey Ching's parents traveled eight hours to Children's Surgical Centre for a diagnosis and treatment. Doctors have tentatively diagnosed her with a condition found in children that affects the growth plates around the knee. The disease causes the growth plate near the inside of the knee to either slow down or stop making new bone. She will need an operation to correct both of her bowing tibias. If not treated, it can lead to progressive deformities of her legs however surgical treatment will correct her bowed legs. Mey Ching's family needs help to pay for this $521 procedure at CSC to save their daughter from permanent disability. Mey Ching's mother said: "We are so worried that Mey Ching will never walk or attend school. We are hopeful that the doctors at CSC can fix her legs so she can go to school and play with friends."

60% funded

60%funded
$315raised
$206to go