Juan Pablo SarmientoMONTHLY DONOR
Juan's Story

Juan joined Watsi on May 13th, 2014. Six years ago, Juan joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Juan's most recent donation traveled 1,900 miles to support Primer, a 50-year-old farmer from Haiti, to fund cardiac surgery to replace his damaged heart valve.

Impact

Juan has funded healthcare for 75 patients in 11 countries.

All patients funded by Juan

Kidus is a five-month-old baby from Ethiopia who is his parents' first child. Some of his favorite activities include breast feeding and playing with his mother. His parents are both students and farmers. They earn their income by selling fruits from their farm; however, the weather in their area is very sunny and their land is dry, which makes their harvest limited. Kidus was born with an anorectal malformation, a congenital condition that leads to a complete or partial intestinal blockage. He needs to undergo a series of procedures to eliminate bowel dysfunction. Kidus recently underwent a colostomy, an intestinal procedure that inserts a colostomy bag. His parents share that paying for this surgery was very difficult. They had to borrow the money from individual loaners, and it has been difficult for them to repay it. In the middle of these challenging times, they heard about our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, and their care center, BethanyKids Myungsung Christian Medical Centre. Kidus's parents decided to seek financial assistance so he could complete the series of surgeries he needs. Kidus is now scheduled to undergo surgery to correct his condition on August 17th. Our medical partner is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of Kidus's procedure and care. After his recovery, Kidus will no longer experience bowel dysfunction and will be able to live more comfortably and confidently. Kidus's dad says, “We were happy that we got this opportunity. We hope that our child will get the treatment and make stool just like other people.”

62%funded
$941raised
$559to go

Thu Zar is a 21-year-old woman who lives with her parents, three sisters, and three nieces in Mae Sot near the Thailand-Burma border. Her family moved from Shan State in Burma to Thailand in 2008 in search of better opportunities. She used to work at a logistics company until two weeks ago when she quit due to her condition. Her parents run a small shop from their home, and her oldest sister is a cleaner at a restaurant. One of her other sister’s is unemployed and her third sister as well as her three nieces all go to school. In 2015, Thu Zar felt a small mobile mass in her chest. She did not feel any pain at the time and forgot about the mass. In 2019, she attended a workshop about reproductive health at her school, run by Mae Tao Clinic (MTC). During the workshop she remembered the mass and later when she was alone, she checked to see if it was still there. She felt the mass and thought that it had increased in size, but she did not experience any pain. The next day, she told the workshop trainer about the mass. The trainer told her to go to MTC for treatment. However, Thu Zar decided she did not want to take time off from school to go to the clinic, since she thought the mass was not causing her any pain or discomfort. Now, Thu Zar's condition has worsened and causes her great pain. She can only sleep on her back, because if she sleeps in any other position she experiences immense pain. Thu Zar sought treatment through our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund. She is now scheduled to undergo mass removal surgery on June 9th to heal her condition. She is raising $1,500 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Thu Zar is very worried about her health and told us, "I feel very sad and depressed with this condition."

72%funded
$1,088raised
$412to go

Pascalina is a beautiful five-year-old girl. She's is the second-born in a family of three children, and is always notably friendly to those around her. Both of Pascalina's parents are small scale farmers, while her father also seeks out casual laboring jobs to further help earn a living. Pascalina was born as a healthy child, however when she reached one and a half her parents became concerned. At that age they had expected her to be able to stand up and walk, yet she could not. Pascalina was diagnosed with bilateral genu valgus. This is a condition typically caused by an excessive accumulation of fluoride in the bones, which often stems from contaminated drinking water. As a result, Pascalina couldn't stand or walk, as her legs were too weak. Her parents tried seeking treatment for her and used medication, but nothing seemed to help. By the time Pascalina had turned three, despite her feeble ability to stand and walk for a short distances at a time, her parents began to notice that her legs were bent inward forming knocking knees. Last year they visited a local hospital in their village seeking treatment, however were then advised to go to a referral hospital that her parents could not afford. A year later, having not received any treatment, Pascalina’s legs had become so impacted that she was unable to walk or stand without crying due to the pain she felt. A local priest advised her parents to seek care at The Plaster House, in Arusha, Tanzania. There, through internal funding, Pascalina was able to have surgery on both legs to help correct them. However, given the severity of her condition, the first surgery was not enough to fully correct her legs. As a result, she needs another surgery to complete her treatment and her parents are asking for help to fund her care. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 for corrective surgery for Pascalina. The procedure is scheduled to take place on February 11th. With treatment, Pascalina's mobility will hopefully be restored, which will allow her to walk without pain, and play with her siblings and friends like normal. Her risk of having future complications will decrease as well. Pascalina's mother says, "We could not afford treatment for a long time, but since the first surgery, she has improved. We wish to see her continue improving and be like any other normal child."

$880raised
Fully funded

Kenneth is a moto-taxi driver hailing from Marakwet County in Kenya. Kenneth completed his secondary school education in 2014 but did not proceed to college due to a lack of funds. He lives in a single-roomed rental house and he depends on his low-paying job to pay rent and provide daily needs for his family. During the afternoon on Saturday, November 6th, Kenneth was involved in a hit-and-run road traffic accident with a motorbike when he was headed home from his daily hustle. He sustained injuries on his leg including a fracture of the left femur which was confirmed after doing an X-Ray. Kenneth was brought by his brothers to our medical partner's hospital where his fracture was immobilized and he was admitted to the surgical ward. He is currently unable to use or move his leg. He is also in immense pain. This road accident has been extremely tough for Kenneth and his family since he has been the only breadwinner. Now he is worried about the struggles his family might face if he is not treated. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On November 9th, Kenneth will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. This surgery will rid him of the pain and restore his ability to use his leg. He is seeking financial support to help him undergo the surgery. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,145 to fund this procedure. Kenneth says, “I want to receive treatment [and] walk again so that I can be well and continue supporting my family.”

$1,145raised
Fully funded