Ryan's Story

Ryan joined Watsi on September 4th, 2019. Four years ago, Ryan joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Ryan's most recent donation supported Nelson, an 79-year-old father from Philippines, to fund surgery for a bladder stone removal.

Impact

Ryan has funded healthcare for 41 patients in 10 countries.

Patients funded by Ryan

Nelson is a 79-year-old loving father from the Philippines. He lives with his partner and relies on their only son's financial support to meet their basic needs. He has a passion for gardening and loves to plant vegetables at home. Three years ago, Nelson's health took a downturn when he experienced bleeding during urination. After a consultation, he was diagnosed with a urinary tract infection and was prescribed medication. However, the pain reoccurred, prompting further investigation. An ultrasound revealed the presence of a bladder stone, necessitating surgical intervention. Over time, Nelson's condition has deteriorated, leading to increased urinary frequency and pain, which severely hinders his daily activities. Fortunately, Nelson found his way to our medical partner World Surgical Foundation Philippines (WSFP) who will be helping him receive the treatment he needs. He is scheduled to undergo a urinary cystolithectomy, the removal of the bladder stone, on July 21st. A portion of the cost of his treatment is being supported by the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation, and WSFP is raising $1,128 to cover the remaining cost. After treatment, Nelson will hopefully have a pain-free and healthier life. Deeply appreciative of the support he received, Nelson shared, "I'm eternally grateful to Watsi and World Surgical Foundation Philippines. Your generosity has given me hope to have a more comfortable life, and be free from all that I've been enduring for years."

$1,128raised
Fully funded

David is a 24-year-old male from Kenya. He is the last born in a family of four children raised by his mother. He works at a timber workshop near his home. In June 2020, David was involved in an accident where he was hit from the side by a motorbike. He was taken to the nearest public hospital and received emergency care. An x-ray revealed that he had an open right tibia fracture that needed surgery. Following his initial surgery, he has since had several additional surgeries due to the severity of the injury. In October 2022, he was referred to the care center, AIC Kijabe Hospital, run by our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare (AMH), for specialized review and care. His doctors quickly realized that he still walks with a limp, and his ankle is stiff with bloody discharge from the incision site. His doctors determined that a deeper examination was needed, and he ended up having a hardware removal surgery. However, the region where the fracture occurred is still severely infected, and he risks losing his right leg due to the infection. The doctors have recommended an additional procedure to remedy the remaining issues and clean the infection. Fortunately, AMH has scheduled David for a second-stage bone transport in hopes of avoiding amputation and helping him walk again. AMH is requesting $1,500 to fund the procedure and provide for David's post-operative care. David says, “I feel exhausted and worried. I am unable to walk despite having several surgeries. I hope this surgery [helps] to save my leg.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Thay is a one-year-old girl from Burma. She lives with her parents, grandfather, three sisters and a brother in a village. Thay's mother looks after her and her brother at home, her grandfather is retired, and her sisters go to school. Thay's father works as a porter, but has has difficulty finding work for over a month. With the increasing number of internally displaced people settling in their village due to the humanitarian crisis, there are now many individuals competing for the same work. When Thay was around eight months old, her parents noticed that her head was increasing in size. As a result, Thay cannot yet sit up or crawl. She is only able to turn her head, and will cry if she cannot see her parents. Thay was recently diagnosed with hydrocephalus, which has causes fluid to build up in her brain. Without immediate surgery to alleviate the intracranial pressure, Thay is at risk of developing severe, potentially fatal medical complications. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to fund the insertion of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt for Thay, which will drain the fluid that has accumulated in her brain. The procedure is scheduled to take place on May 20th and, once completed, will greatly improve Thay's quality of life as she grows up. Thay's father said, "I am thankful to every organisation and everyone for supporting my daughter’s treatment cost. Because of you, I believe that my daughter will receive surgery and be healthy and live a normal life after treatment."

$1,500raised
Fully funded