Thibault HutzliMONTHLY DONOR
Thibault's Story

Thibault joined Watsi on December 8th, 2015. Two years ago, Thibault joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Thibault's most recent donation supported Monicah, a widowed mom-of-six from Kenya, to fund treatment for cervical cancer.

Impact

Thibault has funded healthcare for 35 patients in 10 countries.

All patients funded by Thibault

Monicah a hardworking mother of six. Some of her children have finished school while the others are still studying. Monicah's husband, who was the sole breadwinner of the family, was the assistant chief of the area where they are living, but he passed away a few years ago. Monicah shared that upon her husband’s death, she had to get out of her comfort zone and figure out how to provide for their family. After a long time of doing some casual jobs where she could find them, she got a job as a house help but her earnings are limited. Her family does not have a National Health Insurance coverage and is not able to raise the funds needed for Monicah’s surgery. In July 2021, Monicah went to the hospital for her regular clinic appointment and heard that there was a free cervical cancer screening centre there. Monicah has been experiencing lower abdominal pain so after the clinic, she went to be screened. The results were not as she expected. She has been diagnosed with cervical cancer. The doctor has scheduled her for total abdominal hysterectomy surgery but she is afraid the cost is too much for her to meet. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1260 to fund Monicah's surgery. On January 7th, she will undergo gynecological surgery at our medical partner's care center. Once recovered, Monicah will be able to resume her daily activities free of pain and hopes to live a life cancer-free. Monicah says, "I did not know that I was sick and since then things have happened so fast. I do not know where the money for my surgery will come from but I know that God will make a way.”

81%funded
$1,032raised
$228to go

Poe is a 45-year-old man who lives with his wife in a hut in a village in Myawaddy Township in Burma. Poe and his wife are agricultural day labourers, but he had to stop working two to three months ago, when his condition worsened. The income she earns is usually just enough to cover their daily expenses, but if she cannot find work, they have to borrow money to make ends meet. Around seven years ago, Poe got bamboo splinters in his left foot while working on a farm. He was able to pick out the splinters and applied traditional medicine to his foot, which healed. A little while later, he developed pain where he had the splinters before and went to a nearby clinic. A nurse checked his foot but told him that she could not find anything wrong with his foot. The nurse gave him pain medication and Poe went back home. After he took the medication, he felt better. Six or seven months later, his pain returned, and he also developed an infection. When he went back to the clinic, the nurse checked his foot and told him to go to a hospital since he signs of a severe infection. The nurse also gave him medication. He then went to Myawaddy General Hospital, where he had the ulcer cleaned with an antiseptic solution and was given medication. When he went home, he felt better. Two years ago, the pain and ulcer returned but in a larger area then previously. He went back to Myawaddy General Hospital, where he received an x-ray. He was told that his foot was infected due to his previous injury. His foot was cleaned again with an antiseptic solution, and he was given antibiotics. After he took the medication, he felt better again. Just a few months ago, Poe’s foot started to hurt again. However, he was not worried about his foot because the last time his foot had hurt, he had had the ulcers drained. When the pain and swelling increased in his foot, he was no longer able to work. Although he wanted to go to the hospital, he did not have enough money to go this time since he was not working. His brother then told him to go to Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH) in nearby Mon State since it is more affordable. When Poe arrived at MCLH at the end of November, he was admitted after the doctor examined his foot. He received another x-ray and was told that the ulcers and an infection had spread to multiple areas. He was also told that because of how advanced his condition is, his foot could never heal fully, and the only option at this point was to amputate his foot. “I’ve been to many hospitals and clinics already,” said Poe. “The doctor told me that if I amputate my foot my condition will no longer return. So I am happy to go ahead with the procedure.” Currently, Poe’s left ankle and feet is swollen and painful. The pain is worse at night and when the temperature drops. He has multiple ulcers in his foot with discharge and he feels extremely uncomfortable. Some areas of his foot are itchy and painful while he has lost sensation in the top of his foot and areas around his ankle. Cannot put any weight on his left foot due to the pain and has to be pushed in a wheelchair since he arrived at MCLH. He's hopeful about feeling better soon and getting back to working. Poe shared, “In the future I want to buy one or two cows to breed and rear them to earn an income. I also want to grow and sell vegetables."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Ar is a 28-year-old man who lives with his wife, three sons, and two daughters in a refugee camp. Originally from Burma, his family fled to Thailand 20 years ago due to civil war. His children attend school, except for his youngest daughter, who is not yet old enough. His wife is a homemaker and Ar works as a day laborer when work is available. Ar's family shared that, in addition to his day laborer pay, they receive a monthly cash card from The Border Consortium to purchase food in the refugee camp. Overall, the family's total monthly income is just enough to cover their basic needs. On September 2nd, Ar climbed a tamarind tree to pick tamarinds fruit. When the branch he was standing on suddenly broke, he fell and landed on his right arm and experienced pain in his back. He visited the camp hospital that day, and the medic initially determined that his arm was not broken. Due to recent positive COVID-19 cases in the refugee camp, Ar could not be immediately referred to the local hospital for further testing and was kept for observation at the camp hospital. When the pain in Ar's back and arm did not subside the next day, the medic referred Ar to the local hospital. After receiving a negative COVID-19 test, Ar was finally able to visit the hospital on September 6th, where he received an X-ray for his arm and a blood test for a second COVID-19 test. The X-ray revealed that his upper right arm is broken. With the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund (BCMF), Ar will undergo surgery on September 8th to reset his fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure will enable Ar to continue working in the future. BCMF is requesting $1,500 to fund this procedure. Ar shared, "I am scared to receive surgery. But I was told that I will not be able to work using my right arm if I do not receive surgery, so I gave my consent to the doctor. I hope that I will be able to work again after I receive treatment."

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Lengai is a 7-year-old boy and the last born of four children. Lengai is a friendly and playful boy who is of age to attend kindergarten. He wants to go to school like his siblings, but due to a deformity on his right foot, he is not able to walk the long distance to and from school. Lengai's parents work as livestock keepers to make a living for their family. Lengai was born with a congenital deformity called syndactyly on his right foot and the fingers of his right hand. As a result, he cannot walk without pain, and is not able to move and use his fingers easily. Lengai's parents noticed his condition early on in his life, but due to the distance from their village to the nearest clinic, and the high cost of care, they were not able to seek treatment for him. Through a mission organization, Lengai was referred to our medical partner's care center, the Plaster House, for treatment. Lengai has been scheduled to have surgery on his right fingers so that he can use his hand in carrying out his daily life activities. Soon after, he will undergo treatment to correct his right foot. Fortunately, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is helping Lengai receive treatment. On May 7th, surgeons at their care center will perform his hand surgery. Once recovered, he will be able to use his fingers with ease. Now, Lengai needs help to fund this $874 procedure. Lengai’s mother shared, "We were unable to seek treatment for our son not because we were okay seeing our son struggling to walk and use his right-hand fingers, but instead because of life's hardships. Please help our son."

$874raised
Fully funded

Naw Mu is a five-year-old girl who lives with her family in a refugee camp in Northern Thailand. Naw Mu, her older brother and older sister are all primary school students. Her mother is a homemaker and her father works as a day laborer outside of the camp when he can. Her parents also look after a small shop in the camp. Her family's combined income is just enough to cover their family expenses and are grateful they can receive basic healthcare and education in the camp. On April 8th, Naw Mu was playing with her friends when she fell to the ground and injured her left arm. Her mother immediately took her to the hospital in the camp, run by Malteser International Thailand. When the medics examined her arm, they suspected that Naw Mu's forearm was fractured and referred her to another hospital to confirm her diagnosis. After Naw Mu received an x-ray, the doctor confirmed that Naw Mu's radius and ulna bones are broken. Currently, Naw Mu is experiencing pain in her left arm and has to take pain medication to have comfort and to sleep. She cannot lift her left hand or move it around. Fortunately, with the help of our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, Naw Mu will undergo surgery to reset her fractured bones and ensure proper healing. The procedure is scheduled for April 9th and will cost $1,500. With this treatment, she will no longer be in pain and she will be able to move her hand and arm fully again in the future. Naw Mu's father shared, “my daughter loves to play outsides with her friends and watching cartoon clips on the phone. After she receives surgery, I hope that she is able to play with her friends again.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded