Kelli KerkmanMONTHLY DONOR
Kelli's Story

Kelli joined Watsi on June 14th, 2013. Eight years ago, Kelli joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Kelli's most recent donation traveled 1,900 miles to support Rodjana, a creative preschool student from Haiti, to fund heart surgery to treat multiple cardiac conditions.

Impact

Kelli has funded healthcare for 133 patients in 15 countries.

All patients funded by Kelli

Pwe is a 56-year-old woman who lives with her husband, her older brother, her daughter and her grandson in a refugee camp in Tak Province, Thailand. Since they came to the refugee camp, Pwe teaches at one of the primary schools and she earns 1,060 baht (approx. 35 USD) per month. She has a resourceful family: Her daughter teaches piano on a keyboard, and she earns around 2,000 baht (approx. 67 USD) per month. Her older brother is a carpenter who earns income when someone commissions a piece of furniture. When he does have work, he will earn around 150 baht (approx. 5 USD) per day. Pwe's grandson is a nursery school student in the refugee camp. Her son-in-law went back to Burma to visit his parents in 2019. Due to COVID-19 restrictions, he has been unable to come back to the refugee camp since then. All together, they work hard to make finances meet their day to day needs. The doctors at our medical partner's care center, Mae Sot General Hospital (MSGH), have diagnosed Pwe with a cataract in her left eye. Currently, Pwe cannot see people’s faces and she can only perceive light out of her left eye. With her right eye, she can see things that are near, but nothing that's far away. She received a pair of eyeglasses from the doctor at MSGH after her first visit, which helps her see better with her right eye but if she does not wear the eyeglasses, she cannot read or teach her students. Fortunately, on February 23rd, doctors will perform a lens replacement surgery, during which they will remove Pwe's natural lenses and replace them with an intraocular lens implant. After recovery, she will be able to see clearly again and go back to teaching her students without difficulty. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to help fund Pwe's treatment. She said, “Since the vision in my left eye worsened, I feel uncomfortable reading and teaching. Sometimes, I ask my daughter, who also graduated from high school in the refugee camp, to teach in my place as I cannot read or prepare my lesson plans.”

$1,500raised
Fully funded

Titus is a 22-year-old motorcyclist and is the sixth born in a family of nine: six boys and three girls. His father earns wages from farming and working in other people’s farms, while his mother takes care of their house and family. They live in a two-roomed iron-built house in their village. Two months ago, Titus was involved in a road accident. He was riding a motorcycle that lost brake power and fell into a ditch. Titus sustained lacerations on his knee and fractured his right patella, and was rushed to a nearby district hospital where he was sutured and discharged home. Three weeks later, when he tried to stretch his leg, his wound opened and an X-Ray imaging of his leg revealed an open patella fracture. The doctor has recommended open reduction and internal fixation surgery and skin grafting to avoid further complications and further wound infection. Currently, Titus is in pain and has to use a walking frame to get around. His parents have desperately searched for a solution, but their socioeconomic status with the family of many children in school with fees has limited the options of helping Titus. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On January 13th, Titus will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. This procedure will relieve him of his pain and he'll be able to use his leg once he recovers. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,145 to fund this procedure. Titus shared, "My biggest hope is to get an opportunity to be treated so that I can go home to better my life.”

$1,145raised
Fully funded

Annastasia is a very joyful lady. The 47-year-old is married and has five children. Two of her children have already finished school and are not yet financially stable. Her husband does not have a job but is sometimes able to get work as a bus driver when they need more help. Annastasia used to sell charcoal but she stopped the business three months ago when she fell ill and started her treatment process. In September of this year, she noticed a mass in her right breast. Three days later, she went to a facility near her home area, was examined, and told that she had mastitis. She was immediately admitted, put on medication and a few days later, she was discharged. While at home, she noticed that the swelling was getting bigger. She went back to the facility, was examined again, and referred to another nearby facility. In the facility scans and test were done and she was immediately referred to Kijabe Hospital for treatment. Upon arrival at Kijabe hospital, Annastasia was scheduled for urgent surgery. However, she is not in a financial position to cater for the surgery and is appealing for financial aid. Annastasia has been diagnosed with breast cancer. Without treatment, the cancer may spread to other organs. A mastectomy, a surgery to remove breast tissue, has been advised to rid her body of breast cancer and to prevent the cancer from metastasizing. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1110 to cover the cost of a mastectomy for Annastasia. The procedure is scheduled to take place on December 30th. After treatment, Annastasia will hopefully return to a cancer-free life. Annastasia says, "When I was told that the mass could be cancerous if not removed, I felt helpless and knew that it was over for me.”

$1,110raised
Fully funded