Maggie's Story

Maggie joined Watsi on October 29th, 2014. Four years ago, Maggie joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Maggie's most recent donation traveled 8,400 miles to support Melissa, an artistic student from Tanzania, to fund knee surgery.

Impact

Maggie has funded healthcare for 63 patients in 12 countries.

Patients funded by Maggie

Melissa is a 16-year-old girl who resides in Sanawari, Arusha region and currently lives with her grandparents. Her parents are based in another region due to work commitments, and they diligently strive to send money to cover Melissa’s living expenses as well as assist with other financial needs. At school, Melissa especially likes her art classes. Melissa suffers from a condition called bilateral varus, causing stress on her knees and lower limbs. She was diagnosed with bilateral genu varus, a condition that developed six years ago. The condition causes stress on her knees and lower limbs. Her legs are not severely bent, but she endures considerable pain when standing for prolonged periods and walking extended distances, leading to easy fatigue. As a result, Melissa experiences pain when walking long distances. Previous attempts at medical intervention involved a visit to the hospital, where she was prescribed medication, vitamin D, and calcium. Unfortunately, they had to discontinue the treatment after one month due to financial constraints. Melissa's family discovered our medical partner's care center, Kafika house occurred during a hospital visit for treatment, where a doctor directed them to the center. They travelled to the facility and were assessed. Surgical treatment is deemed necessary to improve her condition so she can have a full life ahead. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $880 to fund corrective surgery and treatment for Melissa at their care center Kafika House. The procedure is scheduled to take place on January 16th. Treatment will hopefully restore Melissa's mobility, allow her to participate in a variety of activities, and greatly decrease her risk of future complications. Melissa's grandmother says: “I hope after this treatment, my granddaughter will be free from pain when she walks.”

$360raised
$520to go

Babi is a cute toddler from Ethiopia. He is an only child and loves to play with toy cars; he pushes the toy making the sound 'uuuuuvvvv', saying it's a car. His father, who has a 5th-grade education, used to work in the horticulture industry as a laborer, but he lost his wife a year back to tuberculosis and has been trying to balance everything on his own. After his mom's death, Babi had no one to take care of him besides his dad, so his dad decided to leave his job to take care of his child and try to get him the necessary treatment. Babi experienced a bowel obstruction, and he got three surgeries at Negele Arsi General Hospital, but he still had complications with his bowel. There is a small window for corrective surgery, but colostomy closure is preferred since the opening is too small. Babi's father has suffered with the whole process and feels he is highly affected psychologically as Babi cannot make a stool in a normal way. Earlier, Babi underwent a colostomy, in which the end of the colon is brought through an opening in the abdominal wall. This surgery is often performed to bypass bowel malformations, but colostomies are usually temporary and may call for closure. In Babi's case, his colostomy requires closure to restore bowel function and prevent future complications. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,009 to cover Babi's colostomy closure cost. Once completed, he can grow up more comfortably and confidently. Babi's dad said, "After he gets the treatment and heals, I hope he will go to school and lead a good life in the future."

$1,009raised
Fully funded

Reuben is a 60-year-old labourer from Kenya. He hails from Rungiri in Central Kenya. He is married and has two young children. Reuben does casual jobs either at construction sites or any other that may be available. His wife is a homemaker taking care of the children. Being the only breadwinner, Reuben has been doing well in his jobs. But about two weeks ago, he was given the job of picking avocados. Unfortunately, the ladder he was using accidentally fell, and thus he also fell to the ground. He sustained an injury to his right hand and was taken to the hospital where an x-ray was done and confirmed a fracture. A bandage was applied and he was advised of the need for orthopedic surgery and asked to go to a bigger hospital. He opted to come to Nazareth Hospital where the surgery can be performed. Due to his socioeconomic status, Reuben and his family cannot raise the fee for this treatment and require help. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On September 14th, Reuben will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. If untreated, Reuben may not be able to use his hand, and the fracture may fail to heal properly, leading to deformity. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,049 to fund this procedure. Reuben says: “I am the breadwinner of my family and have no one to turn to for these treatment charges. I kindly request to be assisted so that I can be well, go back to do my job and feed my young family."

$1,049raised
Fully funded

Six-year-old Tay lives with her mother, sister, and brother in a village in Shan State in Burma. Tay's mother is a teacher. When Tay was three years old, she was frequently ill with a rapid heartbeat and fingertips that would turn blue. Her mother brought her to a nearby hospital, where the doctor told them that Tay had congenital heart disease and would need to be treated in Yangon. However, due to the Covid-19 pandemic, Tay's mother did not feel it was safe to take Tay to Yangon. When she turned five, Tay's symptoms worsened, and her mother brought her to a hospital in Yangon in August 2022. At the hospital, Tay was diagnosed with an atrial septal defect, and her mother was told that Tay would require surgery- which the family could not afford to pay for. Fortunately, Tay's aunt referred her to our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, for help. Now Tay is scheduled to undergo atrial septal defect closure at Pun Hlaing Hospital on May 13th. As Tay is becoming progressively more ill- with episodes of rapid breathing and weight loss due to a lack of appetite- this procedure is critical for her health and well-being. Burma Children Medical Fund is seeking $1,500 to cover the cost of Tay's care. “When I learned that my daughter [Tay] needs surgery, I felt very sad and I cried because I cannot afford to pay for her surgery. But when I learned that the organization [BCMF] will support the cost of my daughter’s surgery, I felt very happy and thankful to all the donors and that organization. I want to see her healthy,” said Tay's mother.

$1,500raised
Fully funded