Rajas PargaonkarMONTHLY DONOR
Rajas' Story

Rajas joined Watsi on May 8th, 2013. Two years ago, Rajas joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Rajas' most recent donation traveled 8,300 miles to support U Eain, a 33-year-old monk from Burma, to fund heart valve replacement surgery.

Impact

Rajas has funded healthcare for 129 patients in 15 countries.

All patients funded by Rajas

When U Eain was 10 years old, he became a monk. Now, at the age of 33, he lives with five other monks in a monastery in Yangon, Burma. As a monk, U Eain doesn't have an income. Instead, every morning, two of the novice monks from his monastery collect food donated by followers in Yangon. In addition, worshipers who visit the monastery donate vegetables, fruits and curries to eat. When the monks preach in other villages, they may receive small cash donations, and when U Eain's parents visit him every year, they provide U Eain with a small amount of money. In this way, the monks are able to cover their basic needs. In February, U Eain went to a town in Mon State to preach. During his second day there, he felt very tired and struggled to breathe, and ultimately, he had to stop preaching. He went to a local clinic, where he received two injections that helped him to feel better. The next day, he returned to his monastery in Yangon. Once he was home, he developed a fever and felt very tired, so he went to a nearby clinic. There, he received an electrocardiogram (ECG). After his results came back, the doctor told him that there were problems with his heart, and U Eain was referred to Yangon Government Hospital for an echocardiogram. On April 19th, U Eain had the echocardiogram, and then brought the results back to the nearby clinic. Due to numerous issues uncovered by the test, U Eain will need cardiac surgery to replace two valves in his heart. Fortunately, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is able to help U Eain access the care that he needs. On October 21st, doctors at Pun Hlaing Hospital will replace the two valves in U Eain's heart, relieving him of the chest pains, rapid heartbeat, fatigue and difficulty breathing that he suffers from now. With his limited income, U Eain needs your support to raise the $1,500 to cover the cost of the procedure. He is hopeful to feel himself again soon and looks forward to returning to preaching and teaching. U Eain said: “I am so happy to receive treatment. I would like to say thank you so much to all of the donors.”

62%funded
$935raised
$565to go

Loy is a 46-year-old small scale farmer and a strong mother to her five children who range from the ages of 21 to 11 years old. Due to difficult finances and lack of resources, all of Loy's children have received a partial primary school education at various levels. Loy and her husband earn their income by farming, and their family lives together in a four-room mud house for shelter. Four months ago, Loy began experiencing severe lower abdominal pains that have caused her many sleepless nights. She believes that her uterus is very weak because she had a number of complicated deliveries when she gave birth to her children. She visited a doctor in March and was given temporary medication to help ease the pain and discomfort. Months later, she can now no longer sleep comfortably, and has had to completely stop farming due to the pain. Loy has been diagnosed with chronic pelvic inflammatory disease and needs to undergo a hysterectomy, the surgical removal of the uterus, in order to treat her condition. Fortunately, on May 13th, Loy will undergo gynecological surgery at our medical partner's care center, Rushoroza Hospital. Once recovered, Loy will be able to resume her daily activities free of pain and continue on with her farming in order to take care of her family. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare, is requesting $319 to help fund this surgery. Loy says, “I can no longer practice farming in my current condition and my family depends on farming. I hope to get well through surgery so that I may be able once again take better care of my family.”

$319raised
Fully funded

Khin is a sweet and loving grandmother from Burma who helps her family manage their household. She lives with her daughter, her two sons, her two daughters-in-law, and her beautiful granddaughter. One of her daughters-in-law will give birth in the coming days, and her other daughter helps manage the household along with Khin. Both of her sons work as day laborers. Some of Khin's favorite ways to spend her time are praying and playing with her sweet six-month-old granddaughter. This past February, Khin's small toe on her left foot was amputated at our medical partner's care center, Mawlamyine Christian Leprosy Hospital (MCLH), due to a severe ulcer. In July, she developed another ulcer near where her small toe was amputated. Because of her condition, Khin is experiencing pain and swelling in her left foot. She also has little appetite and difficulty sleeping. She currently cannot put any weight on that foot, meaning she has not been able to walk. Fortunately, our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is helping Khin receive treatment. On July 15th, surgeons will perform a debridement, a surgery that will remove the damaged tissue from her foot, to help her walk and live free of pain. Now, Khin needs help funding this $694 procedure. Khin shares, "I want to be healthy because I am old, and I don’t want to make any problems for my family. Thank you so much to all the donors who are supporting my free treatment. I hope that my condition will heal fully after surgery. I just want to live happily with my family for the rest of my life."

21%funded
$151raised
$543to go

Thein is a 42-year-old woman from Burma. She lives with her husband, son, daughter, mother-in-law and step-granddaughter in Palu Village, Myawaddy Township, Karen State, Burma. Thein’s husband is still recovering from an illness and is also looking after her as her caregiver. Her mother-in-law has impaired vision and is looked after by her children. Her two children stopped going to school in 2020, when schools closed due to COVID-19. After the coup in February 2021, their school never reopened. Thein works as a day laborer and as a farmer, but she has not been able to plant anything this year. In December 2021, she and her family had to flee their village for a month due to armed clashes in their village. After they were able to return, Thein was too scared to go to her farmland since she had been told that the area around the village is full of landmines. It has been a very difficult time for their family as Thein’s house was also destroyed during the armed clashes in their village. They are currently living with Thein’s mother-in-law, whose house partially survived the recent violence and destruction. Thein's family currently lives off of donations that Palu villagers receive as internally displaced peoples (IDPs), and the rice they harvested last year before they had to flee. Since July 2021, Thein has been experiencing backpain when she sits or lays down. She feels better when she is standing or walking. After she eats, she feels bloated and uncomfortable. She has been diagnosed with large abdominal endometriosis. She has been advised to undergo a total abdominal hysterectomy, the surgical removal of her uterus and cervix. If left untreated, Thein's symptoms will continue to worsen and put her at risk for further health complications in the future. Fortunately, Thein is scheduled to undergo her hysterectomy on July 20th. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is requesting $1,500 to cover the total cost of her procedure and care. Once recovered she will no longer be in pain and will be able to sit and lie down comfortably. Despite the hard moment they are in, Thein tries to stay hopeful about rebuilding her life: “When I recover fully, I want to go back to work so that I can earn money. I want to rebuild my house and live there with my family.”

66%funded
$1,001raised
$499to go

Regina is a 13-year-old girl from Kenya. She is the secondborn in a family of three children. Her parents separated a few years back, and she and all of her siblings currently live with their mother in their ancestral home. Regina’s mother practices small-scale farming to provide food for their family. Her mother shares that she previously ran a small kiosk in their hometown where she sold fruits, but she has been unable to sustain the business since Regina fell sick in June. They currently rely on Regina’s grandmother to help support them. Regina has been diagnosed with hydrocephalus, a condition in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in the brain and increases intracranial pressure. As a result of her condition, Regina has been experiencing fevers and severe headaches. Although she and her family have been to different hospitals seeking treatment, they have not seen much change in her condition. Fortunately, they were referred to our medical partner's care center, BethanyKids Kijabe Hospital, where she will undergo surgery to treat her hydrocephalus. Without treatment, Regina would experience severe physical and developmental delays. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $720 to cover the cost of surgery for Regina. The procedure is scheduled to take place on August 17th and will drain the excess fluid from Regina's brain. This will reduce intracranial pressure and greatly improve her quality of life. With proper treatment, Regina will hopefully develop into a strong, healthy young girl. Regina’s mother says, “I am not happy that my child is in this condition. I want her to get well and bring back my happiness.”

31%funded
$230raised
$490to go