Jay's Story

Jay joined Watsi on October 7th, 2015. Six years ago, Jay joined our Universal Fund, supporting life-changing treatments for a new Watsi patient every month. Jay's most recent donation supported Sylvia, a 56-year-old caretaker from Philippines, to fund a thyroidectomy.

Impact

Jay has funded healthcare for 82 patients in 12 countries.

Patients funded by Jay

Alazar is a sweet boy from Ethiopia. He is the seventh child in his family. Five of the children are girls and two are boys. He loves to sing songs, go to church, try martial arts, and drink juice. His dad is diabetic and his condition causes him to faint often. He has government health insurance and gets treatment in a local government hospital. Because of his condition, Alazar's dad cannot work. His mom makes traditional bread and sells it on the street to feed her children. She makes her bread by firewood and this makes it hard for her to always have the smoke of the wood making the bread. She is the only one who works for income in their family, but her older children help with housework. They bring water from the spring carrying it on their back. She proudly sends all her children to school. Alazar underwent an earlier colostomy, in which the end of the colon is brought through an opening in the abdominal wall. This surgery is often performed to bypass bowel malformations, but colostomies are usually temporary and may call for closure. In Alazar's case, his colostomy requires closure in order to restore bowel function and prevent future complications. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,009 to cover the cost of a colostomy closure for Alazar. The surgery is scheduled to take place on January 9th and, once completed, will hopefully allow him to live more comfortably and confidently. Alazar's mom said: “After he gets the treatment and heals I will praise my Lord. I will tell everyone who knows me about the hand of God. I did ask God ‘to heal my baby. You gave me this child; don’t take it away from me. I always cry and pray.’ I hope God has heard my prayer leading me to you. I will go to my church and testify what God did to all community in the church.”

$431raised
$578to go

Hapyness is a charming 9-month-old girl, born to hardworking farmers in the remote village of Igot, in the Ulanga district of Tanzania. Her family's daily life revolves around the cultivation of maize and millet, which not only sustains their meals, but also provides a modest income for the family’s necessities. Unfortunately, her father, who is advancing in age, cannot work extended hours, so her mother toils diligently on the farm, to ensure they yield bountiful harvests. Hapyness was born with a clubfoot, a condition in which the foot is abnormally twisted, making it difficult for her to crawl and eventuall to walk. At the time of her birth, the nurse in attendance recommended immediate medical attention. However, locating such specialized care in their isolated village proved to be impossible. After months of searching, Hapyness' father crossed paths with a young boy who had had a clubfoot which had been successfully treated, and he was able to provide Hapyness' father with the information he had been seeking. As a result of this meeting, Hapyness' parents brought her to the Plaster House, where her treatment will begin on October 6th. Our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $935 to fund Hapyness' clubfoot repair. After treatment, she will be able to crawl and to walk comfortably as she grows. Hapyness’s mother says: “I am glad there is a chance for my daughter to get treatment. I hope she doesn't have to live with this disability for the rest of her life.”

$935raised
Fully funded

Reuben is a 60-year-old labourer from Kenya. He hails from Rungiri in Central Kenya. He is married and has two young children. Reuben does casual jobs either at construction sites or any other that may be available. His wife is a homemaker taking care of the children. Being the only breadwinner, Reuben has been doing well in his jobs. But about two weeks ago, he was given the job of picking avocados. Unfortunately, the ladder he was using accidentally fell, and thus he also fell to the ground. He sustained an injury to his right hand and was taken to the hospital where an x-ray was done and confirmed a fracture. A bandage was applied and he was advised of the need for orthopedic surgery and asked to go to a bigger hospital. He opted to come to Nazareth Hospital where the surgery can be performed. Due to his socioeconomic status, Reuben and his family cannot raise the fee for this treatment and require help. Fortunately, surgeons at our medical partner can help. On September 14th, Reuben will undergo a fracture repair procedure, called an open reduction and internal fixation. If untreated, Reuben may not be able to use his hand, and the fracture may fail to heal properly, leading to deformity. Now, our medical partner, African Mission Healthcare Foundation, is requesting $1,049 to fund this procedure. Reuben says: “I am the breadwinner of my family and have no one to turn to for these treatment charges. I kindly request to be assisted so that I can be well, go back to do my job and feed my young family."

$1,049raised
Fully funded

Seint, who is 34 years old, lives with her parents and her aunt in Ayeyarwaddy Division in Burma. Her parents and her aunt make and sell mats from their home. When Seint was 13-years old, she noticed she started to easily tire, experienced heart palpitations, and had barely enough energy to play with her friends. Her mother took her to a nearby clinic, where the doctor examined her and told them that she had congenital heart disease. The doctor gave Seint medication, which she used together with traditional medicine. Both helped her to feel better. In November 2022, Seint felt extremely tired and experienced heart palpitations while she was completing physical exercises with her students. She also had difficulty breathing, and her vision became blurred. Her mother took her to a clinic, where she received medications which helped her to feel better. A few days later, however, she started to experience pain in her back whenever she felt tired. She also started to have difficulty breathing again, and had heart palpitations. Her mother brought her to a hospital in Yangon, where she received an echocardiogram that allowed the doctor to diagnose her with atrial septal defect. After additional testing, the doctor scheduled her to undergo urgent heart surgery at Pun Hlaing Hospital. Our medical partner, Burma Children Medical Fund, is seeking $1,500 to fund Seint's surgery, which will allow her to regain her health, and to live symptom free. Seint said: "I would like to recover as soon as possible. In the future, I will continue to work as a teacher. I love teaching students and wearing our school uniform proudly."

$1,500raised
Fully funded